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WiLBEAHAM PUBLIC UBRAffT 



FRLCQN 1980 




MINNECHAUG REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
MAIN STREET, WILBRAHAM, MA. 01095 

Editor-in-Chief Lisa Fusco 

Asst. Editor-in-Chief Tracey Zeckhausen 

Academics 17 . . . Kathy Andrews 

Seniors 39 . Scott Leven 

Patti Melcher 

Activities 89 Ann Paulhus 

Judy Pezza 

Sports 115 Bob Crawford 

Kristin Graves 

Underclassmen 157 . Elaine Horton 

Rosey Guthrie 

Ads 181 ... Seda Aykanian 

Beth Insley 

Copy Editors Sue Anti 

Amy Young 

Photo Editor ...... Larry Delgrego 

Advisor Diane Jeserski 

Business Advisor Art Tipaldi 

Business Manager Julie Fife 



PjS. ft 




U> \l , Coll 

801634 





All the votes had been tabulated, and the barrage of sugges- 
tions had been narrowed down to one finalist. The students at 
Minnechaug High School were pleased to hear that their new- 
ly-elected mascot was-THE FALCON! And so an era began. 

The symbol of Minnechaug is the mighty falcon, and any 
way you look at it, it couldn't have been a better choice. More 
specifically the prairie falcon, our mascot, is an especially 
good one to symbolize our sports teams, since this bird is one 
of the fastest in the world; it has been clocked at over 180 
miles per hour while diving. Our falcon is also quite fearless; it 
will attack prey as large or larger than itself. (Sound familiar? 
Our football team sometimes does the same thing!) 

The prairie falcon is a native of the Rocky Mountains and 
does its hunting in the dry, grassy prairies familiar to that area 
where it has a whole smorgasboard of prairie animal delica- 
cies to choose from. Although prairie falcons (and most of the 
other kinds) are extremely rare in the United States today, 
there are two specific places where they can be fairly easily 
found: Atlanta's football team, and-you guessed it-at good ol' 
Minnechaug High! 









When the town of Hampden was born, it naturally needed a 
source of income in order to thrive. Jobs and food were in 
demand for its people. Power was required to run its mills. 
What early Hampden needed was a river. And the Scantic 
River was there, ready and willing to become the lifeblood of 
the new town. 

Although still depended on today, the Scantic River hit its 
prime about a century ago when Hampden was struggling to 
become a prosperous town. The first sawmill was built on the 
Scantic in 1790 by Lewis Langdom. Mr. Langdom was the first 
in a long line of millers to draw power from the rushing waters 
of the Scantic. 

Some historians maintain that the word "Scantic" comes 
from an Indian word meaning "branch of a river." (The Scan- 
tic River is a branch of the Connecticut River.) Others believe 
it comes from the Indian word meaning ''whiting fish," the 
kind of fish caught by the Indians in the Scantic. Either way, 
there's no denying that today's residents of Hampden owe a 
great deal to those first settlers and to the surging, life-giving 
body of water called the Scantic. 






Something about a small town appeals to the senses. May- 
be it's the absence of traffic and car horns beeping at 5 p.m., 
neon lights glaring through your windows at night, or the smell 
coming from dingy smokestacks. Instead, a small town offers 
a healthy and peaceful place to live. 

Sunlight pours through sparkling windows, unhindered by 
city smoke and haze. The air is scented with smells of flowers 
blooming and smoke billowing out of chimneys. People smile 
and nod as you pass, bikers race up and down the sidewalks, 
and joggers chat with you, exchanging the latest gossip and 
news from around town. As you move along, the faces of 
many small town friends and aquaintances bring back misty 
memories of the past. 

Maybe all small towns aren't like this, but they all have one 
thing in common that you can't find in a big city: a feeling of 
belonging, of having found your place in life and fitting right 
into it. 




- - 







Main St., Wilbraham, the heartbeat of a thriving metropolis. 
Well maybe not a thriving metropolis, but Main St. is the 
busiest part of Wilbraham. There is, believe it or not, a lot to 
do on Main St. You can get a book or see a flick at the library. 
You can check out the "wanted" posters in the post office. 
The meetinghouse near the academy is open for tours on 
weekends and has a lot of information on the history of Wilbra- 
ham. Part of Main St., near the center, has been designated as 
a National Historical District. Rices and Green's fruit farms 
always have lots of apples and part-time jobs during apple- 
picking time. 

So you see, there might not be skating rinks or recreation 
centers on Main St. and there aren't any movie theaters, but 
Wilbraham is pretty interesting once you get to know it. 






Nestled at the edge of the Berkshires, Wilbraham, and 
Hampden are two of the most scenic towns in New England. 
The beauty of our towns especially stands out in the fall when 
the foliage is at its peak. 

Looking down on the Wilbraham Country Club from Stony 
Hill Road is a spectacular sight in the autumn. The emerald 
green golf course is enhanced by a backdrop of trees speckled 
with colors of scarlet red, yellow, and pumpkin. On a clear 
night, the view of Wilbraham Mountain from Highridge Road is 
really lovely as the lights of the Connecticut Valley glisten 
below. On a sunny day you can see Mt. Toby to the north and 
Trap Ridges in Connecticut to the south. Woodland Dell Ceme- 
tery is another magical spot. It's ten and a half acres are 
peacefully secluded on a wooded hillside, creating a tranquil 
setting. The view of the Hampden Country Club's lush grass 
and sparkling ponds from the clubhouse is one of the most 
gorgeous scenes in Hampden. Throughout both towns, road- 
side streams, old houses, farms and many other peaceful 
settings add to the towns' beauty. 







You're driving nonchalantly down Bennett Road in Hamp- 
den. Suddenly you do a double take, hit the brakes, and your 
car comes to a screeching halt. Disbelievingly, you look again. 
Yes, what you're seeing is the curser of the Red Baron, the 
buddy of Woodstock, and the dog-person of Charlie Brown; 
it's a giant Snoopy, straight out of the Peanuts comic strip. 

Snoopy Rock in Hampden is the product of the imagination 
of a few talented people who, not too many years ago, saw the 
potential and creative possibility in a huge, gray rock sitting 
unnoticed by the side of Bennet Road. With a lot of white paint 
and a little less of black, the rock was magically transormed 
from blah to a sensational replica of our hero, Snoopy. With 
Snoopy's paint job faithfully kept up, thanks to the people 
living in the vicinity, Snoopy can be seen grinning away at all 
the motorists cruising by him on Bennett Road. Snoopy Rock 
is really a delight to see and worth going a little bit out of your 
way for. So go on, take a ride by, and see if you don't do a 
double take. 






If you're a newcomer to school, one of the hardest things to 
learn is how to pronounce our school's name. Minnechaug 
isn't one of your average "look-it-up-in-the-dictionary" words. 
It's an Indian name meaning "Berryland". When Indians used 
to live in Wilbraham, wild blueberries grew all over the town. 
Most of the berries are gone now, but the name Berryland 
carries on. When Minnechaug was first built, a contest was 
held among the students to come up with a name for the new 
school. The winning name was submitted by a number of 
students who knew a little bit on the history of the town. 
Today we are again reminded of "Berryland" by the presence 
of Project Blueberry, which was named after the old Indian 
name. So if you think Minnechaug is a crazy name for a 
school, just imagine how you'd feel being a student of Berry- 
land Regional High! 






Stanley Klimkowic 



KLINK 



The jingle of keys, the shuffle of movement, Klink comes 
bounding around the corner smiling a hearty "Good morn- 
ing. " For me, it was worth rising ridiculously early every morn- 
ing to arrive at school while the halls were dark and silent just 
to greet Klink, to exchange stories and smiles with him. 

Emptiness fills the halls this year. I hear the jingle of keys 
and eagerly wait for Klink to round the corner. He doesn 't. But 
I see him huddled over a door handle, fiddling with a broken 
locker, putting up the flag. I miss him. Terribly. Dearly. There 
was a cheerfulness, a goodness, a diligence about Klink that's 
irreplaceable. 

Nancy Winetrout 



RCRDEMICS 



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J. Emerson 
Special Education 








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J. Kennedy 
Foreign Language 



M. Kibbe 
Industrial Arts 




R. McCarthy 
Foreign Language 



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It's quite an experience to visit a culture differ- 
ent from ours. Alot of people have had the oppor- 
tunity to travel and visit those different cultures. 
One of those lucky people was Minnechaug's 
own Mr. Hanscom. He was selected from seven- 
ty-five men to go to Japan as one of five goodwil 
ambassadors. During his stay of five weeks, Mr. 
Hanscom observed Japanese culture firsthand. 
He visited many different sites in Japan including 
a Buddhist temple and an active volcano. But, 
the scenery isn't the only thing that's different in 
Japan. Children are taught about respect at an 
early age. Life centers around respect for elders 
and friends. 

Women's Lib hasn't come to Japan yet, 
though. Women are not allowed to participate in 
a conversation between men. It's a don't speak- 
until-you're-spoken-to rule. 

All in all, Mr. Hanscom's trip was very success- 
ful. He learned about schooling in Japan (No 
Smoking) and about daily life. But basically, he 
thought Japan is a nice place to visit but he 
wouldn't want to live there. 





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A. Newsome 
Cooperative Education 





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Mrs. Ats of the Social Studies and Language 
Departments has been teaching for some twenty 
years, accomplishing many deeds for the Stu- 
dent Body. Mrs. Ats formed the Junior Classical 
League six years ago and has raised the club to 
one of the best in the school. She says she 
couldn't run the club alone and this is true, but 
she is the group's backbone. Ideas are usually 
formed by club members and its president, Kevin 
Mack; but Mrs. Ats is the one who adds the final 
ingredients to complete the mixture for a suc- 
cess. After alot of hard work and always finding 
time for the J.C.L., she has never received any 
kind of individual acknowledgement. In the past 
years of working with the Latin students and the 
Junior Classical League, she and the club have 
been awarded many honors, state as well as na- 
tion wide. Minnechaug is very lucky to have such 
a dedicated teacher on its staff. So, the next 
time you hear someone refer to you as, "You 
all," you'll know it's Mrs. Ats. 





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"Common sense 
is instinct. Enough 
of it is genius." — 
George Bernard 
Shaw 



By now, Project Blueberry has become pretty 
well known around Minnechaug. A brief definition 
of it would be: Project Blueberry is a video-cultur- 
al journalism class. Translated that means it's a 
course where students learn about their commu- 
nity and writing by doing television shows about 
people, issues, and life styles within the two 
towns of Hampden and Wilbraham. 

The question now is, who started Project Blue- 
berry? Well, the course was founded by David 
Bernstein and Greg Trimmer, two English teach- 
ers here at Minnechaug. Four years ago, in 1976 
they wrote for a federal grant and got it. And so 
the story begins. 

These two teachers saw a need. Some kids 
weren't getting what they needed out of average 
English courses and others just needed a 
change. In either case they intended to provide a 
solution. And Project Blueberry was it. It pro- 
vides students with a "hands-on" experience to 
learning. It's one thing to write a term paper, but 
it's another thing to write, produce, direct, and 
edit your own television show. That's what 
makes Project Blueberry so special. It's a whole 
new experience for students to go through. It's a 
lot of work yet students are still motivated be- 
cause it's so different. 

Well, now you know who started Project Blue- 
berry, but it is the combined efforts of everyone, 
teachers and students, that keeps it going and 
makes it what it is. And it is a "berry" good 
course. Or, in the words of some of the kids-"We 
only want you to turn us on!" 




,T<HE SENIGRS 





1976-77- Freshmen year began in the bicentennial celebration of our country-a new era for the United 
States- a new beginning for freshmen students. Freshmen year is full of fond memories of wet hair, halls 
named after letters, scary seniors, and confusing things called "blocks." The class of 1980, however young, 
managed to survive. This was the year of the bomb scares. We spent more time outside in the cold than we 
did inside in class. This was the year of the Concert Band's famed trip to Italy, freshmen biology's three-day 
trip to Rhode Island and everyone's trip through the pool. Teachers' names appeared unpronounceable, no 
one could seem to get a grasp on rotating blocks; and, if all this wasn't bad enough, in May they put you 
through arena. If anything, freshmen year became a crucial test, an insurmountable obstacle, a difficult 
dilemma; and just when we thought we had it made, they hit us with sophomore year. 

1977-78- Sophomore year started on a sweet note with the candy sales. Sophomores became walking 
candy machines. "Wanna buy a candy bar?" became the watchword as the first of a long series of 
fundraisers began. Sophomore year memorabilia includes food-fights of unheard of proportions, bruised 
body parts from lifesaving, and, the "Pyro." Minnechaug was ablaze, so to speak, with the newest craze of 
burning things up — this, however, didn't last long. Project Adventure was something that belonged to 
sophomores and sophomores alone. This is perhaps one of the most interesting aspects of our physical 
education program. This course was designed to inspire an individual's self-confidence and to teach 
students how to work out group problems. It was alot of fun and it was co-ed! This was also the year that the 
infamous Minnechaug Falcon Football Team began its long winning streak and captured the Suburban 
League Title. With the close of sophomore year we happily received our class rings and began to look 
forward to being called upperclassmen. 

1978-79- Junior year looked hopeful as we started the year with the calendar sale. The calendar sale was 
followed shortly by the magazine sale which was followed quickly by the junior work weekend. The 
calendars didn't go over too well as Minnechaug juniors stomped door to door begging for people to buy 
calendars. More successful perhaps, was the magazine drive, where if you couldn't get Mom to buy a few 
you could always treat yourself. For the work weekend the juniors were assigned all the jobs the seniors 
never got to — need I say more. Everybody breathed a sigh of relief because there were no more pool 
requirements but then they sprang "disco" dancing on us. No one believed that they had found something 
worse than pool, but they had. On the brighter side, junior year was the year of the license. The license 
entitled you to drive, and driving meant you had to beg, borrow, or steal a car — things were looking up. 
One of the more memorable notes of junior year was the battery of tests administered under the heading of 
college boards-PSAT's, SAT's, ACT's, AP's, and ACH's. (Sounds more like something they might have 
dreamed up in the cafeteria.) Noteworthy is, that as we passed the great divide from mere juniors to 
ultimate seniors, the football team completed its second unbeaten season, again capturing the Suburban 
League Championship. 

1979-80- Congratulations class of '80! We have arrived at our goal — senior year. This is the year of the 
senior kick-off dance, turkey raffle tickets, senior work weekend, the banquet, the senior breakfast, the 
prom, and graduation. Who would have thought we would have survived the rigors of the last three years? 
Both fundraising drives-the turkey raffle and the senior work-weekend were a success. The football team 
wasn't as fortunate though as it broke its winning streak. Nevertheless our spirits weren't dampened as we 
moved forward to Open Campus. Open Campus soon became Senior Privilege — however the seniors are 
still trying to figure out the privilege. We wish better luck to the junior class in this regard. Senior memories 
are of Wednesday half-days once a month, permanent passes to the library that insured meeting up with 
library personnel, and college applications that insured confusion. College, work, the army — whatever 
decision you had to make involved problems, but then we're seniors and seniors can handle anything. We 
were all shooting for that little piece of paper with our name on it that we receive at graduation. The 
memories of our four years at Minnechaug bring laughter, tears, smiles, blushes, pain, and hope. We look 
forward to catch tomorrow, yet we hope that we can hang on to yesterday. 




- SENI0R QFFIEERS 





Dave Normandeau - President 



Linda Bissonette - Vice President 




Judy Dalton - Secretary 



Sue Goguen - Treasurer 




A unified class has to have solid, sound leadership. And through 
the years, the class of 1980 had the good luck to possess such 
leaders. As freshmen, Kay Loftus, Donna Mathews, Mary Hough, and 
Debby Farnham were elected to organize our new class. With the 
irreplaceable guidance of our advisor, Mr. Kennedy, Kay, Donna, and 
Sue Goguen were back sophomore year resuming leadership as we 
ordered class rings and sold candy bars. Organizing our successful 
magazine drive was one duty of our junior year class officers Sue, 
Kay, and Kathy Crawford. By the time senior year rolled around, our 
new president was Dave Normandeau, who was assisted by our very 
dedicated new vice president, Linda Bissonette. The offices of secre- 
tary and treasurer were filled by Sue Goguen and Judy Dalton. These 
four really helped make it a senior year to remember. 

The Class of 1980 would like to sincerely thank its officers who, 
through their dedication during our years at Minnechaug, kept spirit 
and unity at a constant high. They made our class something special. 



^^SlS 



SENIOR SNAPSHOTS 

r~ li r.'i . wit K 




SENIOR PORTRAITS 




Edward J. Albertson Kristen Anderson Kurt Anderson Tami Andre Kathleen Andrews 




Bonnie Ashe Lisa L. Auchter Beth Avery Seda Aykanian Chris Babineau 




Tom Bacon Tom Ballou Thomas S. Barkhuff James W. Barrett Ken Barry 




Mark Batista 



Michael L. Beaulieu Lucille R. Bedard Debra Maria Belli Dana Berenson 



43 



< SENIOR GflNDIIDS 




SENIOR PORTRAIT! 




Craig Bergeron Lee Anne Bilton Debra Bishop 



Linda M. 
Bissonnette 



Barbara J. 
Bosworth 



William Boulanger Carl P. Boyer 



Anne Marie 
Branconnier 



Steven Bordenuk 




Jeffrey Brayton 




Elizabeth Brennan Deb Bressette Paul S. Briand Barbara Ann Brinn Jeffrey M. Brochu 




Robert Brooks James H. Bugbee Betsey Burgess Scott D. Burland Sherry Burnor 



„ SENIOR SNflPS«EITS 




5ENI0R PORTRAITS 




Philip J. Burns Linda M. Cantalini Linda Carney Daniel Carpluck Maura Cauley 




Susan D. Chapin Sharon Chapman Robin Clark 



LeAnn Cobbs Joanne Condon 




Amy Connell J. David Cooke 



James A. Cooley Lisa Marie Cormier Stephanie Ann 

1 Coupe 




Scott Covalt Debra Lynn Cox 



Kathleen M. 
Crawford 



Robert Crawford Michael Croteau 



^SENIOR GANOIDS 




SENIOR PORTRAITS 




James M. Crowder 



Christine C. 
Crowley 



Robert H. 
Cunningham 



Scott A. Cutting 



Lawrence Delgrego Robin Demetrius 



■■■■■■HI 
Frank DeSantis Cynthia Desmarais 



Karen Elizabeth 
Daigneault 




Vincent C. Dailey Judith Dalton Robert Dangleis Lori Dean Karen Delargy 




Mark Dodd 




Scott Dodd Brian Donovan Kevin Dorsey Teresa Douglas Joseph DuBord 



SENIOR SNAPSHOTS 




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5ENIQR PORTRAITS 




Kim Duke 



Carl Duncan 



Sara Dunklee John Dunn 



Lynn Eady 




Cynthia Erickson Tammy Everett Deb Farnham 



William Figoni 



David Fiore 




Sharon Fitzgerald Pam Flodman David T. Florian Dawn Fountain Toni Francisco 




Matthew Fraser Wendy French 



Daniel Fritz Dennis Frodema Cheryl Fusco 



SENIGR EflNDIDS 




SENIOR PORTRAITS 




Lisa Fusco 



John Garber Kevin Garvey Thomas Garvey Charles Genza 




Laurie L. George Eric M. Gerhard Heather Gibb 



Glen Gibson 



Elizabeth Stuart 
Gillan 




Micheal Gleason Margie Goebel Suzanne Goguen Beth Lynn Goodrich Kenneth P. 

Goudreau 




Michell Graff Charles J. Grant David W. Graves Penny Gray Francis P. Grillo 



SENIOR SNAPSHOTS 




SENI0R PORTRAITS 




James Grochmal Daniel Groth Robert A. Guinis Greg Hagopian Jane C. Hale 




\ ffl L 



Brenda M. Hallihan Lisa Hansen 



Todd Haraty Paula May Harris Deborah K. Hartin 




Edward Hatch Grace Hawthorne Joy E. Hawley Ellen T. Heffernan Lisa J. Hermance 




Deborah Hill Brenda Hnatow Wendy Hodgdon Edward Holda William Hoi man 



SENIOR SNAPSHOTS 




SENIOR PORTRAITS 




Stephen Hopkins Jeffrey Horton Mary Hough Jaqueline Hulbert Susan lellamo 




Kevin Ingraham James Irla Daniel Isham Randy Jernigan Torrey Johnson 




David Jones 



Karen Jones Melissa Jones Wendy Jones Brian Jurkowski 




V/M ' 'i 




Christopher Kathy Kaczenski Jeffrey Kerr 

Kacoyannakis 



Kevin Kervick 



Jeffrey Kibbe 



SENIOR EflNBIDS 




SENIOR PORTRAITS 




Jennifer Kibbe 



Neil Kibbe 



Peter Kiley 



Sallie Kirby 



Susan Landa 



Todd Landers 



Jennifer Kline 




Laurie Larson Steven LaVallee Donna LeBeau 




Thomas E. LeDuc 



Sheila Levakis J. Scott Leven Steven Liguori 



SENIOR SNAPSHOTS 




SENIQR PORTRAITS 




Ann Margaret Lively Kay T. Loftus Robert Loveling 



Patricia Dianne Christine M. Lucas 

Lovell 




Michael Lussier James A. Kevin E. Mack Teresa A. Mack Scott B. Mackintosh 

MacCannell 




Jean Mannix Donna Mathews Nanette E. Mathieu Laura A. Mawaka Jody Lynn 

McCollough 




Scott McEathron Jeff W. McFarland Mark J. McGaunn 



Kathleen 
McGranaghan 



Daniel M. McGuill 




I f» ;. | 



62 



Michaele Moriarty 



SENIOR PORTRAITS 




Sherry Lynn 
Moreau 



Eileen Morris Joseph Murphy Thomas Nestor 




Raymond Nietupski Joanne Niquette Thomas Normoyle Daniel O'Brien Kevin O'Shea 




Edward Paulhus Carl Perman Robert Perusse Douglas Pothul Valerie Prouty 



63 



(f-^Y/Y 




SENIQR FAVORITES 





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Cutest - Shelly Moriarty, Mike Miller 

Class Couple - Paula Wolfe & Joe Dubord 

Class Clowns - Jenny Kline, Dan Sullivan 

Friendliest - Deb Orton, Steve Lavallee 

Best Dressed - Holly Wikar, Dave Florian 

Most Athletic - Kathy McGranaghan, John Wolford 

Most Likely to Succeed - Judy Dalton, John Wolford 

Class Flirts - Debbie Belli, Dan McGuill 

Best Figure - Joanne Condon 

Best Physique - Greg Devalle 

Prettiest - Lisa Stroshine 

Handsomest - Dave Florian 




Favorite Beer - Molson 

Favorite TV Show - Mork & Mindy 

Nicest Eyes - Ann Lively, Steve Subject 

Nicest Smile - Heather Gibb, Kevin Dorsey 

Quietest - Kim Tryon, Scott Wiley 

Funniest Laugh - Pam May, Greg Devalle 

Artists - Liz Brennan, Rob Brooks 

Loudest Mouth - Debbie Belli, Tom Read 

Nicest Hair - Rosanna Sloat 

Curliest Hair - Joanne Brennan, Paul Worthington 

Favorite Song ■ Renegade 

Favorite Group - STYX 



Biggest Eaters - Gretchen Schmidt, Steve Wezniak 
Most Mischievous - Joanne Brennan, Tom McCar- 
thy 

Done Most for the Class - Kay Loftus, Dave Norman- 
deau 

Most Spirited - Debbie Belli, Scott Leven 
Favorite Food - Pizza 
Favorite Place - Wilbraham sand pits 
Starsky & Hutch - Scott Macintosh, Chris Sallade 
Laverne & Shirley ■ Judy Dalton, Brenda Hnatow 
Class Musicians - Mary Wolcott, Rob Brooks 
Class Partiers - Cindy Lake, Kevin Reddington 
Tallest - Lisa Hermance, Dave Rheinhard 
Shortest - Heather Gibb, John Kissinger 
Class Einsteins - Pam Floodman, Dave Reinhard 




LISTEN TB WHAT THE SENI0RS flflVE TQ SflY 



"Bye for now." (Mr. Eakins 
Steve Lavallee 






elissa 



"A friend is one who 
knows all about you and 
still likes you." - Sheila 
Moriarty 



"Life is 

learn to lick it." - Ed Hatch 




't eat yellow snow!" - Mark 
McGaunn 



No doubt." - Jeff 




"The gate of excellence is surrounded 
by a sea of sweat." - Paula St. Denis 




"People who want by the yard but try by 
the inch should be kicked by the foot." - 
Dave Reinhard 



imme a break 
Ingraham 




"He who s 

Tjsessliverw 





10 speaks with fork tongue 
ss silverware." - Larry Delgrjgo 



"If time is a waste of life and life is a 
waste of time, why not get wasted and 
have the time of your life." - Jim Barrett 





De Gustibus non disputandum" (The Romans) 



SENIOR SNAPSHOTS 










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SENIOR PORTRAITS 




Polly Rae 



Gary Rahilly 



Kimberly Read Thomas Read Kevin Reddington 




David Reinhard Glenn Riddle Anita Rivenburgh Garret Roach Sharon Roberts 




Donna Robinson Mary Rochford Deborah Roundy Debra Rustin Richard Rymsza 




Donna Marie Lynette Salerno 

Sakowski 



Chris Sallade Terri Sanderson Ann Marie Schibelli 



SENIOR EflNDIDS 





SENIQR PQRTRflITi 




Gretchen Schmidt William Schnepp Marylou Scott Mark Sherman 



Sally Short 




I "♦ 

Deborah Sienko Charolette Simpson William Simpson John Siniscalchi Claire Skrzyniarz 




Jeff Skutnik Rosanna Sloat Roger S. Smith Kathleen Smola Timothy Snow 




Thomas Sparks 



William St. Denis Laurel A. Sternberg Lisa Stroshine 



1ENI0R SNflPSflBTS 







SENIOR PORTRAITS 




Jim Squire 



Steven Subjek Daniel Sullivan Edward Taft Patricia Tamsey 




Gary Tancrati Peter Tarbell 



Paul Tibert 



Denise Therrien Peter Tousignant 




Clifford Tozier 



Kelly Tracy 



Cynthia Troie 



Mary Trute Kimberley Tryon 




Sherry Tychsen Lori Usher 



John 
VanAmsterdam 



Deborah Veinot Gregory Vignone 



SENIOR EflNDIDS 





1 : -*mJU 




SENIOR PORTRAITS 




Steven Wezniak Todd Wheeler 



Sheryl White Peter Whittier 



Holly Wikar 




Joy Wolcott 



Mary Wolcott 



Paula Wolfe 



John Wolford Bruce Wood 



SENIOR SNAPSHOTS 




SENIOR GflNDIDS 




SENIOR PORTRAITS 




Paul Worthington David Wrona Glen Wuerthele 



Scott Wylie Michael Wyrostek 




Joann Brennan Shaun Bugbee Marylou Curley David Fales Thomas Farrington 




Douglas Gendron Gregory Guiney Bruce Holley 



Chris Jalbert 



David Kroll 



SENIOR PORTRAITS 




James Kurpaska Cathrine Magill Michael Maharne Constantinos Mantis Beth Markett 




Pamela May Mary McCaffrey 



Thomas J. 
McCarthy 



Thomas McLaughlin Donald McNaughton 





Patricia NcNulty Michael Miller 



Sean Moore Shelia Moriarty 



David Muir 




Andrew Mulcahy David Normandeau Thomas O'Donnell 



Deborah 
Ogonowski 



Kimberly A. O'Keefe 



SENIOR SNAPSHOTS 




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Steven Payer 



Lynnette Pellitier 




PHOTO SHY SENIORS 



Andrea Allen 
Eric Anderson 
Brian Bolduc 
David Bromley 
Robin Chichakley 
Robert Cochran 
Julia Conway 
Carol Cloutier 
Daniel Deso 
Greg Devalle 
James Donati 
Daniel Driscoll 
David Dulude 
James Ellithorpe 
Mark Fitzpatrick 
Chris Folvi 
Felise Freeley 
Robert Gardner 
Theresa Govoni 
Richard Hand 



Mark Harvard 
Mary Hellyar 
Kathy Kaczenski 
Steven Kalzenski 
Irene Kalogeras 
Dana Kelley 
David Kelly 
Peter Kiley 
John Kissinger 
Greg Kubik 
Patrick Liapis 
Mark Megas 
Stephen Merrill 
Paul Mitus 
Marcus Murry 
William O'Brien 
Diane O'Neil 
Jeff Orszulak 
Richard Ouimette 
Beth Skipton 



Allen Schoolcraft 
Kevin Sears 
Mitcheal Sluda 
David Quill 
Micheal Suchecki 
Stephen Streeter 
Mark Swenor 
Rebecca Walt 
Dwight Zephir 



HERE'S T0 YQU MR. KENNEDY 





• 





JOHN F. KENNEDY 

The best thing that ever happened to the class of 1980 was Mr. 
John F. Kennedy. Mr. Kennedy volunteered his services to help 
our class through our four years at Minnechaug, not an easy task! 
Mr. Kennedy was the most generous and dedicated advisor our 
class could have asked for. He gave up a great deal of his free 
time to help make our senior year the best it could possibly be. 

Mr. Kennedy was an unique advisor because he worked along 
side of our class instead of above us. He stuck patiently by the 
class from our first attempt to raise money until our last. Need- 
less to say, the Freshman dance was not a big money maker, but 
Mr. Kennedy gave the class the encouragement to keep on fight- 
ing. Along with other enthusiastic class members, Mr. Kennedy 
gave up many of his weekends to rake leaves during the Junior 
and Senior work weekends. 

He rarely lost his cool; but when he did, he had good reason to. 
Despite the fact that being our advisor took away from his teach- 
ing time, coaching time, and most importantly his personal time, 
Mr. Kennedy always seemed to have time to help our class. Do 
you remember the bake sale, the Freshman dance, the candy 
sale, our class rings, the calendar and magazine drives, the Junior 
and Senior work weekends, the Kick-Off Dance, and the Turkey 
raffle? These are the many events that made our class one of the 
most successful classes in the history of Minnechaug. None of 
these money-makers would have been possible without Mr. John 
F. Kennedy. The support he gave to the class of 1980 through his 
ideas, his time, and all his effort is priceless. 



Mr. Kennedy, 

The class of 1980 admires and respects you as an 
advisor, as a teacher, as a coach, and most impor- 
tantly as a good friend. You have made our high 
school years most memorable, and we could never 
repay you for all that you have done for us. Thank 
you for everything. 



With love, 




flb SMITH 



Darest Thou Now Soul 
Whitman 

Darest thou now soul, 

Walk out with me toward the unknown region, 

Where neither ground is for the feet nor any 

path to follow? 

No map there, nor guide 

Nor voice sounding, nor touch of human hand, 

Nor face with blooming flesh, nor lips, nor eyes, 

are in that land. 

I know it not soul, 



Nor dost thou, all is blank before us, 

All waits undream'd of in that region, 

that inaccessible land. 

Till when the ties loosen, 

All but the ties eternal, Time and Space, 

Nor darkness, gravitation, sense, nor any bounds 

bounding us. 

Then we burst forth, we float, 

In time and space soul, prepared for them 

Equal, equipt at last (0 joy! O fruit of all!) 

them to fulfil soul. 



RCTIVITIES 




FALCON 
FOLLIES 

The lights dim and hundreds of rowdy voices 
are screaming. The annual Falcon Follies Talent 
Show is about to begin. This year the talent show 
played to a packed auditorium — people were 
being turned away at the door. But those lucky 
people who managed to get inside weren't disap- 
pointed. 

Acts ranged from Mark Trombley's magic act 
to Tony Falcetti's "Feels So Good" on the accor- 
dian. The Minnechaug Cheerleaders did an excel- 
lent routine to the "Fight Song" from The Main 
Event, and the kickline made its annual appear- 
ance to the music of "If My Friends Could See Me 
Now." 

The music at the Talent Show was excellent. 
Debbie Belli sang a solo accompanied on the 
piano by Debbie Orton. Who could forget Mary 
Wolcott and Paula St. Denis' version of "City of 
New Orleans." To end the show, the band, Sen- 
ior Jam, played a song they wrote leaving the 
audience shouting for more. 

A lot of time, effort, and talent was put into this 
event, which helped make this year's Falcon Fol- 
lies the best. 





Falcon Follies performers: L. Barton, D. Belli, 

A. Branconnier, R. Brooks, D. Burque, M. Burque, 

B. Burgess, L. Carter, H. Covalt, H. Covalt, S. 
Cuttings- (emcee)- K. Delargy, M. Drumheller, P. 
Drumheller, A. Ecker, G. Ely, T. Falcetti, D. Fritz, 
B. Gladu, M. Gobel, B. Graff, C. Gregory, L. Han- 
son, K. Hartin, B. Hurley, D. Kroll, D. Laitress, L. 
Langone, L. Landers, B. Leary, S. Levesque, P. 
Lovell, W. Lovell, C. Lucas, M. Metzger, D. Orton, 
D. Owens, L. Pamioli, S. Quill, K. Read, L. Rigney, 
M. Rodgers, L. Salerno, C. Simpson, K. Skala, R. 
Sloat, P. St. Denis, L. Sternberg, J. Teschendorf, 
J. Trabulsi, K. Tracy, M. Trombley, G. Vignone, B. 
Walt, E. Welsh, M. Wolcott. 





JUNIOR 

CLASSICAL 

LEAGUE 



The club with the catapult — that's how most 
people know the Junior Classical League, And 
they're right. This year Minnechaug's JCL re- 
gained their championship title at the annual 
State Catapult Championship. 

But catapults aren't the only thing JCL is into. 
Each year they sponsor the "Battle of the 
Classes" dance. JCL is becoming quite famous 
for their movie production company. This year's 
hit was completely directed and performed by 
JCL members. 

JCL isn't just a club for Latin students — it's 
open to everyone. JCL's advisor is Mrs. Ats, who 
also teaches Latin and Ancient Times. Their lead- 
ers are Kevin Mack, Dave Florian, Linda Bisson- 
ette, and Krista Hahn. JCL is one of Minne- 
chaug's oldest and largest clubs and will hopeful- 
ly continue for many many years to come. 



ront Row: CErickson, R.Senoit. A.FIorian, R.Cooley, J.Piaget, J.Cooley, G.Quirk, J.Struzziero. Middle Row: J.Bosch, D.Kroll, AJordan, 
Peck, L.Byrne, W.Peck, M.VanAmsterdam, J.Jordan, S.McGuann. Back Row: D.Rymsza, G.Lasonde, L.Usher, S.Lannon, J.Sweetman, 
Kochanek. 




-s-.es 



ONE-ACT 

PLAYS 

»ing made up of four plays, one for 

The reason for this was the low participation of 
the freshman, junior, and senior classes. 

The first play was The Twelve Pound Look 
which was about a conceited husband and his ex- 
wife. It was directed by Jinnie Trabulsi and 
starred Chris Levesque and Mary Wolcott. who 

The second play, judged best, was Fool's Para- 
dise. It concerned the mishaps of a couple eating 
at a fancy restaurant. Directing was done by Eliz- 
abeth Bassett. who won the best director award. 
Joe McGranaghan. best actor, Tom Sparks, best 
supporting actor, and Donna Gibb starred also. 

The final play was Really. My Dear, directed by 
Rick Katsanos. This play took place in a living 
room and in the mind of a poet. It starred Meri- 
dith Miner, best supporting actress, and Tom 
Sparks. 

The advisors of this year's One-Acts were Bill 
Adam and Beth Gallagher. They both have exper- 
ience in the theatre and will also direct the spring 
play. 





Best Actor - Joe McGranaghan 

Best Actress - Mary Wolcott 

Best Supporting Actor - Tom Sparks 

Best Supporting Actress - Meridith Miner 

Best Director Elizabeth Bassett 

Best Play - Fool's Paradise 




The Twelve-Pound Look: Front Row: J. Trabulsi. 
P. Getchell. Back Row: R. Gadrauit. C. Bates. M. 
Wolcott. C. Levesque. 

Fool's Paradise: Front Row: E. Bassett. L Woo- 
dard. D. Gibb. J. McGranaghan, Back Row: T. 
Sparks. B. Holda. D. Duval. T. Carmody. S. Lan- 
non. B. Wray. 

Really My Dear . .. : Front Row: J. Teschendorf. 
R. Katsanos. Second Row: K. Hawley. T. Sparks. 
S. Deputy, S. Dias. M. Miner, Back Row: C. Hal- 
gas. E. Voight. A. Bond. A. White. L. Sattler. S. 
Hicks. 

Technical Crew: Front Row: C. O'Connell. L. 
Bearse. J. Bardwell. Back Row: W. Carter. J. Fife, 
B. Leary. S. Quill. S. Strohman. J. Valentine. 




Office Aides: A. Ely and J. Albano. Missing: K. Ballard, L. Bearse. L 
Ellard, D. Fusco, H. Leard, D. Rustin, L. Woodard, J. Zimmerman 
R. DeMetrius. 




English Aides: K. Keeton, C. Dubour. C. Burgess. Missing: C. Arabik, M. Fontaine, R. Genza, L. Lappalainen. 








MODEL 
CONGRESS 

"We now recognize the senator from Min- 
nechaug." Model Congress is one of Minne- 
chaug's most interesting clubs. Every year, a 
small group of students, or shall we say "sen- 
ators," write up a bill and bring it to the annu- 
al Model Congress held at A.I.C. 

The group, led by Miss Brewer, has to come 
up with an idea for a bill, write the bill up, and 
finally one nervous senator has to read the bill 
to the Congress. Model Congress is the best 
way to learn about our government. Who 
knows, maybe some of the members of Min- 
nechaug's Congress will end up in Washington 
DC. 



Back row: K. Kervick, K. Crawford. M. Brewer, advisor. B. 
Gillan, D. Jones, F. Grillo. Front row: C Kacoyannakis, M. 
McEathron, T. Therrien, C. Matthews. 




MINNECHAUG'S 
MATHLETES 

Arc sec cos (arc sin (-1/2)) + tan [arc cos yri] 

Can you understand this? If you can, the Mathletes want you! Mathletes 
compete with schools from the area doing extremely hard math problems. 

The meets involve a lot of hard thinking as well as a quick mind. If you make a 
mistake deciphering, it could lose the whole meet. Over all, it's a dedicated 
bunch of kids who form the Mathletes team. 




First row: C. Levesque, A. Nelligan, J. Sweetman, M. Sullivan, P. Flodman. Back row: L. Blanchard. P. 
Setian, J. Jordan, C. Burkins, J. Law, D. Reinhard, R. Cooley. V. Granaudo, advisor. Missing: C. Magill. 



LEADER 
CORPS 

When walking into a gym class filled with peo- 
ple in green and white gymsuits, it's hard to miss 
the three people in bright gold shirts. They're 
members of Minnechaug's Leader Corps; a 
group of juniors and seniors who are selected 
each year to help in freshmen and sophomore 
gym classes. Their time is spent demonstrating a 
penny drop on the uneven bars, showing the 
class how to climb the trees in Project Adventure 
or maybe being a "Victim" in a lifesaving demon- 
stration. There's plenty of work in Leader Corps, 
but along with the work, there's a lot of fun. 





W 




Leader Corps members: Front row: L. Delgrego. D. Berenson. Middle row: J. Servidio. D. Vierthaler. M. McGaunn. K. Goudreau, F. Grillo. J. Bureau, 
K McGranaghan, D. Hartin, J. Dalton. Back row: G. Lasonde. K. Ingraham, E. Heffernan. C. Simpson. D. Sakowski. L. Fitzgerald. K. Skala. K. Sheehan, 
M. Sullivan, M. Sitnik, D. Cooke. Missing: C Shay. G. Kubik. E. Gerhard. T. Johnson. J. Garber, J. Mannix. S. Chapin, E. Holda. S. MacKintosh, M. 
Busha, M. Courtney. C Magill, J. Woltord. A. Young. L. Hermance. M. Cormier. J. Van Amsterdam. D. Florian. K. O'Keefe. R. Sadjak. B. Hnatow, L. 
Hermance. B. Brinn. E. Gillan. J. Kibbe. 




nr 




SMOKE 
SIGNAL 



A typical morning at the Smoke Signal Home- 
room .... "When's the deadline?" ... "1000 
words?!? I haven't written that much in my 
whole life!" ... "No, I can't write for you, I'm 
busy this month" ... "When's the deadline?" 
"Cripes, I think my best writer disappeared!" 
"Due today? I'll finish it tonight." 
"Well, I can't promise you anything . . " ... 
'Layout is just like a jigsaw puzzle!" . . . 
•WHEN'S THE DEADLINE?!?" ... "You missed 
it." . . . "Again?!?" 

Fresh air, nature, friends, and family are things 
never thought of by a Smoke Signal staffperson. 
We don't have time for these things as we toil 
endlessly to bring you the superlative newspaper 
with the glorious motto, "Everything printed to 
fit." 





Smoke Signal Editors: Front row: C. Halgas, P. Getchell, M. Megliola. J. Dalton. J. Willson, S. Chapman, D. Ferguson, J. Garber. Back 
row: K. Norwood. M. VanAmsterdam, G. Crossman, M. McGuan, S. McEathron, P. Flodman. Missing: W. Carter. 





PAVAS 

What kind of people belong to PAVAS? All sorts 
of creative people like artists, dramatists, writ- 
ers, singers, synchoers, gymnasts, and cooks! By 
now, you should know that to get into PAVAS, the 
Performing Arts and Visual Arts Society, you 
need to be creative and talented in some area of 
the arts. PAVAS members sponsor the Harvest 
Day Dance held every fall and the annual talent 
show. "Hardwork and dedication" - that's the 
motto of PAVAS. 




PAVAS members: Front row: D Orton. C. Erickson. A. Peck. L. Palmioli. Middle row: K. 
dreau. K. Fegley. M. Wolcott. S. Lannon. M. Van Amsterdam. F. Conley. W. Peck. Back ro» 



P. Getchell. C. Dubour. V. Trablusi. K. Anderson. L. Mercure. J. 





AS 

SCHOOLS 
MATCH 
WITS 

All though the excitement of meeting Phil She- 
phardson in the flesh was sometimes a little dis- 
arming, the members of the As Schools Match 
Wits team still managed to answer the majority 
of those mind-boggling questions. Practicing 
thinking up answers to those trivia questions 
after school may not be the most physically 
grueling practice, but it certainly isn't easy on 
the mind. And it sure is worth it, because to coin 
a new phrase, "If you don't have the wits, you'll 
end up in the pits." 

Front row: K. Kervick, P. Kiley, B. Bosworth, M. Megliola. Back 
row: D. Pickett, R. Cooley. M. Moody. Mr. Musselmen (advisor), 
P. Getchell, A. Nelligan, D. Magill. 




EMERALDS 

For those of us who dream of seeing our very 
own works in print, Emeralds magazine is an 
excellent start. Printing selected pieces from 
Minnechaug students, the magazine is widely 
read and enjoyed each spring when 'Chaug's 
new crop of authors is unveiled. Flipping through 
a copy, you may be very pleasantly surprised to 
learn that we may, indeed, have a few budding 
Shakespeares or Hemingways among us. 

Emeralds members: Back row: J. Reynolds, M. Wolcott, S. Wil- 
liams, V. Trablusi, M. Van Amsterdam. Front row: S. Lannon, J. 
Hetrick, P. Havican, P. Getchell, Mr. Spencer, advisor. 




YEARBOOK 
EDITORS 

It's a miracle! A miracle is the only way to 
explain how our yearbook comes out on time. 
Actually, it's the hard work of our diligent year- 
book editors. They're the ones you see in the 
halls begging for people to be on their staff or 
screaming because their deadline has suddenly 
crept up to tomorrow. 

The crew of editors are really a bit crazy. Who 
else would want to spend their homeroom period 
in a room no bigger than a closet? Homeroom in 
the yearbook office is a frantic ten minutes with 
editors running around, trying to get their lay- 
outs in on time. But somehow, who knows how, 
the yearbook comes out on time. It's a miracle! 



Front Row: E. Horton, S. Anti, A. Paulhus, L. Fusco, P. Melcher. 2nd Row: A. Young, S. Aykanian, K. Andrews, B. Insley, K. 
Graves. S. Leven. 3rd Row: J. Fife, L. Delgrego. T. Zechausen. B. McCormick. J. Peiza. B. Crawford. Missing: R. Guthrie, D 
Jeserski. 













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CONCERT 
CHOIR 

Minnechaug Regional High School's Concert 
Choir is under the capable direction of Mr. War- 
ren Amerman. This is the largest choral group in 
Minnechaug and this year has maintained its usu- 
al high standards. The Concert Choir performs at 
Open House for parents, sings at the winter con- 
cert, along with the Concert Band, and is avail- 
able upon request to sing at any function which 
wishes to have them. The Concert Choir can be 
heard A Block every day; they always start the 
morning with a song on a happy note. 




Concert Choir Members: M. Balise, J. Beaudry, D. Belli, L. Bilton, T. Bishop. A. Bond, L. Chayer, C Cloutier, K. Crawford, R. 
Demetrius, J. Fife, P. Getchell, C. Halgas, J. Hawley, E. Heffernan, E. Norton. E. Hurley, T. Kacoyannakis, G. Kubik, C Levesque. P. 
Lovell. C. Magill, D. Magill. K. Marrett. M. Mayo. K. McDonald, J. McGranaghan, M. Metzger, A. Moore, S. Morgan. C. O'Connell, D. 
Orton, D. Owens, L. Palmioli, D. Pickett, G. Roche, M. Rogers, L. Roy, D. Russell, L. Satler, S. Short, T. Sparks, S. Strohman, J. 
Teschendorf, V. Trabulsi, S. Tychen, M. Van Amsterdam, B. Witkop, M. Wolcott, A. White. 






CHAMBER 
CHOIR 




Chamber Choir: Front row: S. Morgan, P. Lovell, A. Moore, S. Strohman, C. Magill, M. Wolcott. Back row: L. Roy, J. Fife, J. Teschendorf, 
D. Russell, C. Levesque, D. Magill, D. Pickett, M. Mayo, L. Palmioli, S. Tyschen. Piano: K. Crawford, D. Orton 




Girls Chorus: L. Ablondi, K. Beaulieu. R. Benoit. H. Burt. T. Car- 
mody, W. Chaput. B. Considine, S. Dias. S. Forbes. C. Goodrich, 
C. Gregory, R. Jones, J. McMann. M. Reidy, K. Rice. B. Skipton. 



YEARBOOK 
STAFF 

The dedicated group known as the yearbook 
staff must be the most unappreciated bunch of 
people at Minnechaug. The fact-finding, inter- 
viewing, and advisor-chasing, (and all the other 
jobs the editors don't like doing), are given to the 
staff, who come through every time. Without the 
dedication of the yearbook staff and a lot of ef- 
fort on the part of the editors, the yearbook 
would not yet get finished. 




• 5 >>• 




108 



The Pep Band — Is it a group of somber-faced 
musicians who take their music seriously? Are 
you kidding?! This may be so at band practice, 
but at the football games, the Pep Band just 
concentrates on keeping the fans rowdy and 
spirited. Strains of "The Pink Panther" and "Go, 
Fight, Win!" keep the crowd clapping and stomp- 
ing. The Pep Band was a large part of our Satur- 
day afternoon football games; a part we really 
couldn't do without. 




109 



CONCERT 
BAND 

Whenever a member of the Minnechaug bands 
sees an orange or a grapefruit, he's probably 
reminded of the bandshell that they use during 
their concerts. To raise money for the shell, they 
sold a completely full truckload of citrus fruits 
from Florida. The bands, under the direction of 
Mr. Charles Beeler, perform at Open House and 
also at the winter and spring concerts. They also 
have outdoor concerts in the courtyard. Once 
again, the band is sponsoring a Pop's Dinner 
Concert — complete with a lasagna dinner. 
Along with all the hard work of raising money, the 
bands always give spectacular performances — 
a tribute to all their hard work and many hours of 
practicing. 




Band Members: C. Ayers, K. Anderson. K. Bacon. D. Bishop, R. Brown, M. Bugbee. D. Burque, M. Burque, C. Byrne. D. Campbell, R. 
Cloutier, J. Cooley, R. Demetrius, C. Dodson, K. Dorsey. M. Drumheller, A. Ecker, E. Engalls. A. Fabian, A. Falcetti. K. Fanthrop, B. 
Figoni. K. Fischer, P. Flodman, G. Fortier, M. Fraser, G. Gardell, T. Garvey, J. George. E. Gerhard. N. Getchell, D. Gibb, R. Graff, J. Groth, 
T. Guertin, J. Hand. S. Hill. B. Holda, D, Hulstrom, D. Jones, D. Keith, C. Kerr, L. Kochanek, R. Kokoszyna. T. Labine. C. Ladue, R. 
Lambert. P. Lively, S. Lucas. J. MacNiece, C. Magill. J. Mannix, C. Mantis. W. Mawaka, M. McEathron, S. McEathron. J. McLaughlin, M. 
Megas, A. Mercure, J. Miodowski, E. Morris, A. Nelligan, C. O'Connell, L. Pabich, M. Parke, A. Paulhus, S. Payer. M. Picine, E. Plumb. R. 
Phillips, D. Rheinhard, L. Rigney, B. Secor, T. Shaw, M. Shea, E. Sherman, G. Sherman. S. Short, W. Short, A. Sitnik, M. Sitnik, S. 
Spelzino. T. Stevens. J. Stohman. J. Sweetman. G. Thernen, K. Turley, J. Valentine, B. Veideman, J. Weatherbee, B. Williams, D. Wise, 
M. Wolcott. E. Worester. A. Young. 




SCHOOL 
STORE 

During lunch hundreds of kids are crowded 
around one small window yelling, "Give me a bag 
of peanuts" or "I need a size 9 bathing suit." It's 
like that every day at the school store. The store 
sells anything from pencils to bathing suits. And 
the store isn't just a place to buy munchies; it's a 
different kind of classroom. The kids who work 
there learn all about running a store from every 
aspect, like purchasing items and setting up dis- 
plays. You can always count on the school store 
to have something good to eat if you don't want 
to eat what's on the cat's menu. What would we 
do without the school store? 

School Store members: I. Kalogeras, W. Jones, D. Bromley, C 
Jalbert, L. Carney, D. Therrien, J. Mitchell, advisor. Missing: M. 
Kuhn. 




FOREIGN 

LANGUAGE 

CLUB 

The Foreign Language Club is for students that 
want to do more than speak a language; it's for 
those who want to really experience it. Trans- 
formed into a "garcon" or "muchacha" for a 
while, members of the club prepare exquisite 
foreign pastries, play foreign games, and gener- 
ally experience the culture of the French or 
Spanish. The club sponsors the annual Interna- 
tional Night, and some of this year's members 
took a trip to France where they put their knowl- 
edge to the test! 



Foreign Language Club: Front row: L. Byrne, C. Erickson, C DuBord, C Allyn, G. Kubik. Back r 
Katsanos, J. Bosch. 



: J. O'Shaughnessy, J. Fife, R. 



STUDENT 
COUNCIL 

The Student Council is one organization that is 
definitely alive and kicking. Sure, they get to skip 
a block once in a while, but you can't really call it 
a freebie when they probably end up doing as 
much work there as they would in class. 

This year's discussions included debates over 
the controversial subject of Open Campus, and 
the question of eliminating students' cars. The 
Christmas Semi-Formal was one of the events 
sponsored by this organization. 

Once again, the Student Council served as an 
important link between the student body, facul- 
ty, and administration. They did get their just 
reward, though — a pizza party at Mr. Badger's. 




Front Row: S. Moore, L. Badger, C Boyajian, P. Scarlett, M. Moody. 2nd Row: M. Bugbee, A. Bond, B. Walt, T. Ross, J. McGranaghan, T. Roncalli. 3rd 
Row: C Garvey. R. Guthrie, K. Graves. J. Pezza, T. Zeckhausen, A. Moore, B. Brainerd, L. Lagone. 4th Row: K. McGranaghan, K. Crawford, B. Hnatow, J. 
Dalton, K. Anderson. Missing: D. Normandeau, L. Bissonnette, S. Goguen, D. Farnham, S. Lavalee, B. Schnepp, G. Lasonde, M. Sitnik, M. Ardolino, C. 
Shay, L. Paulhus, J. Buffet, S. Lannon, Miss Walinski, Advisor 




Library aides: Front Row: D. Lanning, A. Wilson, T. Munn, S. Quill, W. French. Back Row: L. Barton, C. Vachon, D. Owens, D. Laitres. 
Missing: K. Askins, D. Desmaris, D. Gottsche, T. Merrill, T. Mileskie. 





PHOTO 
CLUB 

The exceptional form of art called photog- 
raphy is alive and growing at Minnechaug. 
Although the number of members of the 
Photo Club won't break any records, these 
budding photographers constantly impress 
us with their creative and imaginative snap 
shots. They interpret the life that goes on 
around us at Minnechaug. You can take a look 
for yourself, but be sure you knock before you 
open that dark room door! 




CHESS 
CLUB 

What's the most quiet team at Minne- 
chaug? No, it's not the football team and it's 
not the field hockey team. It's Minnechaug's 
one and only chess team. The game of chess 
requires a lot of concentration as well as a lot 
of chess expertise. Minnechaug's chess team 
is a group of devoted players led by "Coach 
Mina". Even though it is the quietest team 
around, one can occasionally hear a voice 
yelling a triumphant "Checkmate!" 



First row: A. Spidel. P. Setie 


n. J. Servidio 


M. Rahimi. M. 


Burque. Back row: D. Burque 


M. Lebeau. J 


Franklin. Miss- 


ing: Mr. Mina. advisor. 








football 




This year's Varsity football team seemed to warm up to 
their on-the-road games 100% better than they did their 
home ones, as their final record dictates. But besides the 
snap of the 21-game winning streak and the bad luck at 
home, the season didn't turn out too bad. The names on the 
back of the player's shirts improved the game immensely 
for the spectators who previously had to check a program 
every time they wanted to know who was doing what. 

Kevin Dorsey's long runs and the help he got from side- 
kicks Gary Rahilly, Tom Read, junior Tom Coville and fresh- 
man Varsity starter Bruce Strange along with the general 
effort from the whole team, made for quite a few moments 
of excitement in the stands. And the impressive accomplish- 
ments from both freshmen and J.V. teams hold a lot of hope 
for the future. 








I 



FOOTRA. 

WINNECHAUG REGIONAL HIGH .vHOOl 

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* 







varsity football 4-6 



F. Row: Coach Martin, T. Garvey, S. LaVallee. K. Dorsey (Capt.). J. Brochu (Capt.). T. Read (Capt.). Moriarty, G. Jobson. R. Goguen. L. Bauer, B. Gordon. G. Lasonde. T. Stevens. K. McCullough. J 

G. Riddle. J. Cooley. Coach Sawyer. 2nd Row: Coach Drowne. B Simpson. K. Anderson. M. Beaulieu. Coffee. 5th Row: T. Larson. K. Goodreau. E. Yazel. T. Schwendemann. J. Zephir. D. Trevallion. K. 
B. Schnepp. G. Hagopian. T. Barkuff. G. Rahilly, D. McGuill. B. Zimmerman. J. Irla. 3rd Row: M. Tobias. C. Thibeault. T. Shaw. 6th Row: M. Theocles. B. Strange. P. Rymsza. J. Szmyt. S. Barret. B. 
Caliento. S. Clark, E. Worster. T. Coville. D. Birkhauser. B. Follansbee. G. Thomas. T. Stolki. J. Riddle, B. Roundy, T. Connors. R. Webber, D. Person. 

Wawrzyk, J. Hennmgsen. M. Libby. C. Goebel, J. Marchessault. 4th Row: G. Ellington, D. Papesh, K. 




freshman football 
8-0 

Left to Right. 1st Row: K. Dubord. D. Orzulak. J. Kuselias. J. Beaudry. J. Schnepp. M. Skala. b 
Burns. S. Rymsza. G. Rahilly, B. Bishop. 2nd Row: Coach Lagunowich. D. Olend. D. Cohn. 
Fabian, C. Tryon, W. Carter. K. Tobias. D. Keith. D. Gwatkm. M. Sweeney. K. Bukhaeuset. 
Asmar, C. Christianson. 3rd Row: J. Mello, B. Sanderson, T. Bishop. D. Ramsey. M. Kline. I 
Lucas. C. Lee. Head Coach Winston 



cheerleading 




P-S-Y-C-H-E-D, Get psyched, get ROWDIE! And this year's 
Varsity and Junior Varsity teams certainly are! Whether 
they're echoing through the halls after school, or trying to 

get the crowd going during the games their spirit never 

dies! 

Because, really, what is the duty of a cheerleader? They 
practice just as hard as any other sport, maybe even hard- 
er. A cheerleader is responsible for getting the crowd rowdie 
and ready for the game. 

Have you ever sat through a game without chanting a 
cheer in your head or out loud along with the squad? Those 
cheerleaders really are the ones who keep the school spirit 
and togetherness alive. 

This year under the coaching of newly-hired gym teacher 
Miss Rickarby, and former Minnechaug cheerleader J.V. 
coach Miss Owens, the teams have been working harder 
than ever. Both teams led by Varsity Captain Lisa Langone 
and J.V. Captain Janet Welch, have and will continue to 
cheer through a terrific season of football and basketball. 




varsity 
cheerleaders 



L to R-B. Walt, B. Walt. M. Rogers, M. Metzger, L. Langone (Capt.), H. Covault, K. 
Hartin, K. Skala, H. Covault. L. Rigney 




j.v. cheerleaders 

B. Row: S. Anti, A. Piecuch, L. Lander. 2nd Row: D. Owens. J. Hettrick. M. Bugbe 
J. Steng. F. Row: J. Whyte. J. Welch (Capt.). M. Fraser. 








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soccer 








The boys' Varsity Soccer team, led by captains John Wolford 
and Steve Wezniak, looked really great this season. With the 
expertise of their coach, Mr. Whalen, with the talent of the 
outstanding senior players (the underclassmen get honorable 
mention), and with dedication to practices and drills, the team 
really got their act together and produced an impressive win- 
loss record. The dedication of the team was really apparent 
when in the early October snow storm, they braved the cold 
weather to practice. Of course snowballs were flying and snow- 
men were sculptured out of the newly fallen snow, everybody 
had a good time. But then who says soccer is all work and no 
play? 




varsity soccer 13-6-1 



B. Row: R. Rymsza, C. Shay. A. Moore, D. Vierthaler, J. Garber, G. Burns, 
S. Mackintosh. M. Row: Coach Whalen, R. Gibson. J. Bugbee. T. McCarthy, 
S. Bugbee. K. Kober. T. Fuller. F. Row: C. Boyer, S. Wezniak (Capt.). J. 
Wolford (Capt), P. Tarbell. 




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junior varsity 
soccer 9-5-2 



B. Row: J. O'Shaughnassy, M. Avery. G. Moretti, C. Hough, J. Servidio, R. 
Messier, P. Dunn, R. Viedeman, J. Berenson. Coach Tipaldi. F. Row: R. 
Downes, C. Coupe, J. Metzger, P. Servidio, J. Leven, T. Messier, D. Lloyd, 
P. Cambo, C. Mulcahy. 





freshman soccer 
4-8-1 



B. Row: J. Baker. D. Wise, D. Chapin. K. Shaw (Capt), M, Presz (Capt.), K. 
Pokorny (Capt.), K. Trombly, J. McNaughton. C. Lebrecque. J. Piaget. F. 
Row: S. Miller, J. McGaun, C. Cantalini. A. Young. M. Balise. R. Carrigan. W. 
Azak. M. Guthrie. H. Carranza. Missing: J. Shawy. Coach Balser. 





Two sides to a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, squeezing out the bus door, 
were followed by a teddy bear, a trash bag bug. and a Roman tripping over her 
toga. Other mean characters, warpaint on faces, slid out the door too, ready 
to "Kill the Rams". This was just one of the ways the field hockey team got 
psyched for their games. Back of the bus jokes spurred on by co-captain 
Brenda Hnatow and goalie Lisa Fusco also got the team laughing and ready to 
win. 

But out on the field, they quickly got down to business. Senior co-captain 
Kathy McGranaghan's orders, "Sticks down, Minnechaug". immediately sent 
ten sticks plunging to the ground. Few opponents could stop Carol Ferrier's 
fifty-yard drives or Linda Mandolini's soaring scoops. Betsy Brainard and 
Carrie Garvey dominated the right side of the field, constantly cutting for flat 
and through passes. 

Once off the field, the seriousness was scrapped. The boy's soccer team 
appreciated the efforts of the field hockey team in redecorating their locker 
room with shaving cream so much that they thanked the girls by making a 
personal appearance at the field hockey party. It was definitely a season all 
would remember and none can forget. 





varsity field hockey 

Back Row: K. Strepka, A. LaFrance, D. Swain, E. Brainerd, C. Garvey. C. Ferrier, M. 
Sitnik. Second Row: K. Bailey (Mgr.), K. Kane, L. Mandolini, A. Jordan, J. Tamsey, S. 
Shaw, K. Motley (Mgr.). Third Row: Coach Caron, K. Andrews. R. Demetrius. L. Fusco, 
K. Anderson. S. Aykanian. Front Row: B. Hnatow (Capt.). K. McGranahan (Capt.) 

4-6-4 



j.v. field hockey 

Back Row: B. Gladu, D. Wilson, A. Berrenson, K. Schmidt, N. Bergeron, D. Robinson. J. 
Tamsey, D. Nolte. T. Rae. Middle Row: M. Sullivan. G. Sherman, L. Sattler, A. Maj- 
kiewcz. K. Holden, A. Sitnik. K. Turley. S. Thorpe. S. Lannon, R. Benoit. Front Row: K. 
Murphy. S. Jones, C. Zirakian, C. Goguen, Coach Reed. Missing: K. Smola. 

3-3-3 




This year's cross country team ran to an excellent 
record of 10-3-0, following last year's 4-5-0 performance. 
The team was led by Captain Dan Sullivan, who turned in 
seven team first-place finishes. Other members with 
team first-place finishes were senior Bruce Wood with 
three, junior Kevin Stone with two, and junior JohnTarbell 
with one. 

The team also did well at the Valley Wheel Champion- 
ship Competitions held on their home track. Senior Bruce 
Wood was the top finisher for Minnechaug, placing eighth. 
Seniors Dana Berenson, Scott Mikkola, and Dan Sullivan 
and juniors Ken Schafer, Kevin Stone, and John Tarbell 
also turned in good times. 

In the past, Coach Bamford and Assistant Coach Bar- 
rett had a problem in that not many freshmen tried ou1 
for the team. However, this year three freshmen compet- 
ed for the Falcons, including only the second girl who ever 
ran with the team, Lisa Merritt. 

Next year will hopefully be another winning one for the 
Falcons. 






cross country 10-3 

Front Row: B. Wood, K. Stone. S. Mikkola, D. Sullivan (Capt.), A. Ecker. J. Tarbell. Back Row: 
Coach Barrett, E. Hatch, J. Sweetman, D. Flynn, D. Gartner, M. SolaroH. D. Neff, K. Goudreau, 
Coach Bamford. Missing: C. Babineau, D. Berenson, K. Schafer, L. Merritt. 




The last three games of the girls' soccer season were the most satisfying 
for everybody. For the first time ever, the girls didn't lose to Cathedral but 
tied 1-1, a definite high point of the season. Tied 0-0 at the half against 
Westside, the girls' hopes were soaring, especially when they got ahead by 
2 in the second half. Unfortunately, when the final whistle blew, they were 
down 6-2. "I was just vomiting on the sidelines," said Coach Deely. But 
their total "annhiliation" (5-0) of Classical, who were good enough to hope 
for a tournament spot, almost made up for it. 

But with all this season's ups and downs t the blowing away of the girls' 
field hockey team in volley ball was a definite victory. "We took all 5 
games," said Coach Deely with a smile. 

Mr. Deely felt that this year was basically a season for building up next 
year's team which should be lethal. With the likes of the Willson twins, Pam 
Melcher, and Lynn Farrar, the pavers of that team, should be more than 
enough to make up for any mistakes made this year. 













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vorsity soccer 



4-9-2 



Back Row: J. McCarthy. M. Grantham, D. Farnham. L. Pokorny, J. Willson, J. 
Willson. M. Harris. B. Brinn. M. Sullivan. M. Courtney. Coach J. Deely. Manager J. 
Struzziero. 2nd Row: Manager M. Mercier. V. Hutchinson, D. Wolford. J. Bureau, P. 
Melcher, D. Orton. J. Zimmerman, C. Downes, S. Harris. Front Row: Captains J. 
Brennan. S. Chapman, L. Brennan 




j.v. soccer 

4-2-2 



Back Row: Coach Wuerthele. B. Considme. M. Clark. R. Cloutier. S. Spolzino, L. 
Ersing. L. St. Germain. L. Schmidt. T. Hebert. N. Sherman, L. Ablondi. E. Henning- 
sen. L. Miller. C. Protheroe. Front Row: S. Clark. J. Misterka, M. Watson. J. Merwin. 
L. Witkop, R. Guthrie. A. Crawford, J. Monarty. D. Scott. J. Poulopoulos. L. Wuerth- 
ele. Missing: B. Schwabbe. L. Simpson 




The numbers in this year's swim team were small, but the 
girls didn't lack in strength or spirit. The senior captains Sue 
Chapin and Jean Mannix, along with seniors Joy Wolcott, 
Cathy Magill, Sue Landa and Polly Rae, tried to "get everyone 
going." Junior Linda Hermance was one of the star swimmers. 
The cheer "Linda Hermance, All Right!" really didn't apply 
because Linda always did all right. 

Two new coaches also made this year different. Sandy 
Blitzer, a star swimmer herself, coached the swimming portion 
of the team, Her assistant, Doug Hawkins, was a student at 
Springfield College. His job was to stand at the end of the pool 
and "lure" the girls to the finish. Pat Lynch coached diving and 
her divers did very well in the meets. 

The team this year has done well. Many injuries and sick- 
nesses prevented the team from being number one, but they 
can't argue about the 4 and 9 record. 








swimming 

4-9 



Back Row: M. Gallagher. S. Chapin. J. Wolcott, L. Badger. C. Boyagian. J. Stoeber. M. Jarvis. 
L. Pabich. P. O'Shea (mgr.). Middle Row: L. Hermance, M. Gibeau, S. Corey. K. Cowee. E. 
Basset. Front Row: P. Rae. C. Magill. J. Mannix. S. Landa, K. Fegley, T. Mulligan. Missing: E. 
Plumb. M. Trute. M. O'Hagen. L. Eady Coaches: Pat Lynch. Sandy Blitzer. Doug Hawkins. 



1979 fall scorecard 



VARSITY GIRLS' SWIMMING 4-9 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 4-6 





OPP. 


MINN. 


Agawam 


28 


6 


South Hadley 


10 


7 


Ludlow 


8 





Amherst 


6 


15 


Greenfield 


28 





Longmeadow 


19 


15 


Northampton 


14 


21 


West Springfield 


34 


7 


East Longmeadow 





6 


Classical 


12 


23 





OPP. 


MINN. 


Amherst 


56 


27 


Cathedral 


104 


68 


Northampton 


56 


27 


South Hadley 


38 


45 


Longmeadow 


110 


62 


Classical 


48 


35 


Westfield 


37 


46 


Cathedral 


57 


26 


Longmeadow 


54 


29 


West Springfield 


70 


101 


Amherst 


99 


73 


East Longmeadow 


41 


42 


Northampton 


113 


67 



VARSITY BOYS' SOCCER 10-5-1 



VARSITY GIRLS' SOCCER 4-9-2 





OPP. 


MINN. 




Chicopee Comp. 


1 


4 


Chicopee 


Longmeadow 


3 


2 


Ludlow 


Cathedral 


3 


3 


Longmeadow 


Technical 


1 


3 


Chicopee Comp. 


Commerce 





5 


East Longmeadow 


Classical 


2 





Westfield 


South Hadley 





3 


Chicopee 


Amherst 





5 


West Springfield 


East Longmeadow 


1 


4 


Ludlow 


Ludlow 


3 


1 


Classical 


Chicopee 


3 





Cathedral 


Northampton 





1 


Agawam 


West Springfield 


4 


2 


Commerce 


Holyoke 





6 


Cathedral 


Putnam 


2 


8 


West Springfield 


Westfield 


1 


5 


Classical 



OPP. 


MINN. 


6 





2 


5 





3 


3 


1 


2 





2 


7 


2 


1 


6 


2 


3 





4 


2 


4 





2 


. 2 





11 


1 


1 


2 








5 



VARSITY CROSS-COUNTRY 10-3 



Technical 

West Springfield 

Pittsfield 

Longmeadow 

Chicopee Comp. 

Longmeadow 

Southwick 

East Longmeadow 

Amherst 

South Hadley 

Ludlow 

Agawam 

Monson 



9\ 



.*.* 



OPP. 


MINN. 


36 


23 


21 


34 


32 


20 


31 


24 


20 


35 


30 


25 


35 


20 


32 


25 


23 


32 


46 


17 


45 


15 


32 


24 


69 


43 



VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY 4-4-4 



Longmeadow 
Southwick 
Agawam 
South Hadley 
East Longmeadow 
Amherst 
Longmeadow 
Southwick 
Agawam 
South Hadley 
East Longmeadow 
Amherst 




■"■•' 



*'2''v^ : ' 




Led by a hard-driving offense and tough-to-beat de- 
fense, the varsity boys' basketball team had another win- 
ning season this year. Everyone made a contribution, 
including the team's manager, senior Larry Delgrego. The 
season was highlighted by outstanding victories against 
Putnam, Longmeadow, East Longmeadow (twice), and 
previously undefeated Amherst. One of the most exciting 
games of the season was against South Hadley, who 
defeated the Falcons 61-60 with a one in a million half- 
court shot at the buzzer. 

Major contributors were made by co-captains Scott 
Leven and Glenn Gibson, and seniors Jeff Kibbe, John 
Wolford, Dave Reinhard and Jim Cooley. The team's 
hopes for the future rest mainly on the only underclass- 
men on the team: Pete Rymsza, Tom Coville, and Don 
Laware. 



am • — — i m ^P 





varsity 

basketball 

13-9 



Front Row: B. Crawford, J. Wolford, G. Gibson (Capt.), S. Leven (Capt.). B. 
Cunningham. Back Row: L. Delgrego (Mgr.), P. Rymsza, D. Laware, J. Cooley, 
D. Reinhard. J. Kibbe, 0. Rymsza, Coach Girotti 



junior varsity 

basketball 

13-7 



Front Row: J. Pickering, B. Downes, D. Dragon, J. Leven, B. Riddle, T. Coville. 
Back Row: K. Corser, P. Barry, K. Corser, B. Maryott, Coach Anderson 



freshman 

basketball 

16-0 



Front Row: D. Trebbe, D. Izzo, D. Pickering, A. Fabian, S. Rymsza. Back Row: 
Coach Hanscom, D. Nelen, D. Ramsey, S. Lucas, B. Devine, A. Asmar 





mnasti<£s| 








Before a girls' gymnastic meet the only place you could 
find Minnechaug's girls' gymnastic team is in the show- 
ers. Not taking a shower, of course, but sitting on the 
floor, listening to Coaches Cascio and Lynch give a pep 
talk. To get psyched for a gym meet, the girls play what 
they call "psyche records" and then do their psyche 
cheer. After the pep talk, the girls are physically and 
mentally ready for tough competition. 

The girls' team is led by Captain Sue Chapin, a veteran 
senior member, who has given nothing but her best to the 
team. This year's season had gone extremely well. Sue 
Chapin, Joy Wolcott, Marcy Sitnik, Kerry Costello and 
Lori Veto are just a few of the members who have given 
excellent performances this year. The girls' gym team is 
most certainly an "unparalled" success story! 



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varsity 

gymnastics 

lO-O 



Front Row: E. Plumb, K. Costello, H. Corey, P. Mazur, R. Benoit, J. Wolcott. Back Row: A. 
Sitnik, L. Veto, M. Sitnik. V. Hutchinson, S. Steng, J. Moriarty, Q. Nolte, S. Chapin (Capt.) 




hockey 




»^£ 




Although our own "Falcons on ice" got off to a less-than- 
spectacular start with a few losses in a row, they soon came 
barrelling back in full force, finally making it to the first place 
position on the charts. Lead by Coach Kennedy and Captain 
Mike Kozub, this feat was achieved by the versatile skating and 
all-around skill shown by the team throughout the season. 
Standouts included the league high-scorer, Doug Vierthaler, 
seniors Dan Sullivan, Scott Mackintosh, and Kevin Reddington, 
juniors Scott Abrahamson, and Greg Brochu and sophomores 
Bill Palm, Larry Lloyd, and Dennis Welsh. The guys had big 
shoes to fill after the tremendous success of last year's team, 
and you'd have to agree that they did a superb job of it. 









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varsity hockey 
19-3 



Front Row: L. Lloyd, W. Palm, D. Sullivan, G. Tancrati, K. McCul- 
lough, G. Brochu, T. Snow, M. Mazur. Back Row: Coach Kennedy, 
D. Welsh. D. Vierthaler. S. Mackintosh, K. Reddington, S. Abra- 
hamson, M. Kozub (Capt.). P. Worthington, D. Verani 



■m 




j.v. hockey 
10-4-5 



Front Row: B. Sullivan, P. Daniele. J. Zephir, K. Trombly, M. 
Havican, M. Presz, J. May. Back Row: M. Skala. R. Troie, A. Eker, 
R. Sanderson, E. Jones, J. Kozub. R. Dorsey, R. Plugge. D. Boissy. 
C. LaBrecque. Coach Kibbe 




u^ 



Better than ever is the only way to describe this year's 
girls' basketball team. Lead by co-captains Penny Gray 
and Brenda Williams and under the guidance of Coach 
Deslauriers the team put forth a superb effort throughout 
the season. Seniors-Lisa Hermance, starting center; 
Brenda Williams and Robin Demietrius guards, and Penny 
Gray, forward add depth and experience to the team. 
Junior Arlene Jordan is Coach Deslauriers' hope for next 
year and the remaining six sophomores are the backbone 
of the team. This team is full of 'Chaug spirit and involves 
everyone in their basketball games. Dave, the team's 
"favorite" referee, has been nominated by the team for 
the coveted "Ref of the Year Award" The team's favorite 
pastimes are shopping for junkfood and touring other 
high schools; their one goal is to win. 



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varsity 

basketball 

2-17 



Front Row: L. Hermance, R. Demetrius, P. Gray (Capt.), B. Williams (Capt), L. 
Simpson. Back Row: Coach Deslauriers, B. Libby, J. Wilson, M. Gibeau, A. Jordon, 
M. Grantham, W. Ouimette, A. Berenson (Mgr.) 



junior varsity 

basketball 

13-7 

Front Row: L. Ablondi, S. Spolzino, B. Williams (Capt.). N. Silva (Capt.), K. Murphy, 
L. Brayton. Back Row: J. Steng, S. Flagg, J. Jordon, S. Walker, M. Mayo, D. Wilson, 
J. Jones 





gymnastics 





Improvement! If you had to choose one word, to de- 
scribe this year's boys' gymnastics team, that would be 
the one. They went from a starting score of 66.7 in their 
first meet to a finishing score of over 88 in the concluding 
Western Mass. Tournament. 

The number one reason for the great improvement was 
the excellent coaching. Keith Lomas entered his second 
year as head coach, while Bill "Adolph" Kalmakis took 
over the reins of second in command. Depth was another 
factor in the Falcon's successful year. Led by co-captains, 
Mike Miller and Dana Berenson, their team spirit carried 
them through the vigorous practices and frequent meets. 

Along with the captains, seniors Roger Smith, Mark 
McGuann, Mark Dodd, and Chris Babineau offered 
strength on each event to aid in the scoring. Other com- 
petitors whose scores counted consistently were juniors 
John Kibbe and Ken Melikian as well as sophomore, all- 
around Mike Moody. 

All in all, it was a very successful year for the Falcons, 
and all the returning gymnasts are looking forward to an 
even better season in the year to come. 





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varsity 

gymnastics 

2-3-1 



Front Row: M. Dodd, M. Davis, M Moody, D. Schafer, M. Branconnier, J. 
Walton. Back Row: D. Chapin, J. Kibbe, S. McGaunn, D. Berenson, M. Miller, D. 
Jacek, R. Smith, K. Melikian, M. McGaunn, J. Tarbell, C. Babineau, J. Beaudry 




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swimming 





GO!GO!GO! 

In case you heard this chant coming from the pool showers 
this past winter, you shouldn't have been alarmed. It was only 
the boys' swim team getting psyched for their meets. Captain 
Frank Grillo was a major factor in keeping this spirit high, which 
helped the swimmers attain their 8-6 dual meet record and 
third place in their division. 

Coached by Hal Miller (who recently had a division named 
after him) and Dave Kaynor, much of this team's success is 
from the effort of the seniors Jeff Kerr, Kevin Ingraham, Jim 
Irla, Steve Payor, and diver Kevin Mack. Outstanding under- 
classmen include junior Tom McGuill, and sophomores Brian 
Semle, and Dave Magill, and freshmen Eric Stroshine and Doug 
Hess, all who were invaluable in some of those closer meets 
and who are bright hopes for the future swim team successes. 




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boys' swim team 
8-6 



Front Row: J. Irla, F. Grillo, S. Payer. Middle Row: Coach Miller, S. O'Donnell, M. 
French, T. McGuill, D. Gartner, P. Hassiotis, M. Megliola, J. Piaget. Coach Kaynor. 
Back Row: D. Hess, E. Stroshine, K. Goudreau, T. Ross, B. Semle, A. Florian, S. 
Nolbrook, J. Cote, W. Miner 




skiing 




You're probably saying to yourself how could the boys' ski 
team perform so well with this year's "lack of snow" or "no 
snow" at all? Captain Gary Rahilly says with a grin, that their 
constant indoor practices, the assistance of Coach Mina, and 
all the combined efforts from all the guys made it possible. 

Meets were held at Berkshire East, with six teams competing 
at once. Berkshire East is also the place where they had their 
once-a-week-"outdoor" practices. Indoor practices consisted 
of running up and down the stairs, sit-ups, push-ups, and any 
other form of calisthenics. 

The contributions of Todd Labine, George Quirk, Chris Shay, 
and P.J. Cambo show great promise for next year's team; 
providing we get some snow. All the guys agree that next year 
they should do a lot better record wise. These and other 
members of the team led Minnechaug into the 80's with high 
hopes and a respectable record. 




boys' ski team 
11-25 



Front Row: J. Shea, M. Palarsic, C. Shay, C. Boyer, G. Rahilly, T. Labine. Back Row: H. 
Caranza, J. McGaun. G. Rahilly, G. Quirk, P. Cambo. J. Metzger, D. Normandeau, M. 
Marchand. J. McGranaghan 





How can there be a ski team when there's no snow? The 
girls' ski team not only managed to find a snowy slope to 
practice on, they also hold their league's second place spot. 
Their top four skiers, Kathy McGranaghan, Debbie Orton, 
Diana Swain, and Carrie Garvey have really boosted the team's 
standing. A lot of credit should be given to Debbie Orton and 
Kathy McGranaghan, team captains, who psyche up their 
team before each meet and practice. 

Some team members were a little worried over the lack of 
snow, but practices were held once a week at Berkshire East. 
After the practices, the team heads to McDonalds for supper 
and talk about the upcoming meets. The girls' ski team is 
definitely a team that has a lot of determination and, most 
importantly, they have a lot of faith. (In the snow of course!) 




girls' ski team 
38-11 

Front Row: D. Orton. W. Luff, K. Cavros, J. Stoeber. K. McGranaghan. Back Row: L. 
St.Germain, H. Carlson, M. Wolcott, C. Goguen, S. Jones, C. Garvey, Coach Deely, D. 
Swain, K. Andrews. Misting: C. Isham 





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1980 winter scorecard 



BOYS' VARSITY BASKETBALL 13-9 



OPP 



Taconic 

Chicopee Comp. 

West Springfield 

Cathedral 

Classical 

Oxbow 

Kennett 

West Springfield 

South Hadley 

Longmeadow 

East Longmeadow 

Putnam 

Agawam 

Amherst 

Ludlow 

South Hadley 

Longmeadow 

East Longmea 

Putnam 

Agawam 

Amherst 

Ludlow 




BOYS' GYMNASTICS 2-3-1 




Cathedral 
Greenfield 
West Springfield 
South Hadley 
Longmeadow 
Holyoke 



OPP. MINN. 

66.80 68.20 

50.45 68.90 

114.80 76.75 

81.10 81.10 

90.10 83.00 



GIRLS' VARSITY BASKETBALL 2-17 



West Springfield 

Chicopee Comp 

Westfield 

Classical 

South Hadley 

Longmeadow 

East Longmeadow 

Putnam 

Agawam 

Amherst 

Ludlow 

Cathedral 

South Hadley 

Longmeadow 

East Longmeadow 

Putnam 

Agawam 

Amherst 

Ludlow 



OPP. MINN. 

Loss 







GIRLS' GYMNASTICS 10-0 



Holyoke 

Cathedral 

Greenfield 

Classical 

West Springfield 

South Hadley 

Agawam 

Amherst 

Longmeadow 

Holyoke 



71 



58 


41 


40 


18 


56 


18 


25 


45 


43 


19 


59 


39 


45 


40 


31 


27 


50 


24 


43 


35 


51 


25 


30 


48 



MINN. 



43.65 


102.95 


99.60 


113.05 


53.20 


110.00 


58.40 


113.70 


108.95 


109.40 


76.70 


113.60 


62.90 


113.90 


85.05 


106.10 


108.05 


115.90 


55.60 


109.40 




BOYS' SKIING 11-25 



Longmeadow 

Cathedral 

West Springfield 

Holyoke 

Minnechaug 

Amherst 



PTS. 






■MB BBBHH1 






GIRLS' SKIING 38-11 


PTS. 




Longmeadow 


56 




Minnechaug 


45 
40 




Cathedral 




MacDuffie 


35 




Holyoke 


31 




West Springfield 


23 




Northampton 


13 




Agawam 


9 



VARSITY HOCKEY 19-3 



Greenfield 

Amherst 

Technical 

Chicopee Comp. 

Longmeadow 

Ludlow 

Technical 

Amherst 

Ludlow 

Longmeadow 

Chicopee Comp. 

South Hadley 

Easthampton 

Ludlow 

Putnam 

Palmer 

Chicopee Comp. 

Longmeadow 

Technical 

Auburn 

Amherst 

East Longmeadow 



19-3 




OPP. 


MINN. 


1 


15 


2 


8 


6 


4 


5 


2 


I 


5 
5 




7 







BOYS' SWIMMING 8-6 

OPP. MINN. 



West Springfield 

Chicopee 

South Hadley 

Taconic 

Westfield 

Gardner 

Cathedral 

Pittsfield 

East Longmeadow 

South Hadley 

Longmeadow 

Cathedral 

East Longmeadow 

Longmeadow 






50 


33 


49 


43 


40 


32 


50 


81 


84 


46 


37 


45 


38 


39 


44 


37 


46 


38 


45 


102 


62 


49 


34 


33 




51 





UNDERCLASSMEN 








C. Cloutier P. Cloutier S. Cochran J. Coffey J. Collitti C. Collins 




C. Cote 


M. Courtney 


H. Covault 


H. Covault 


T. Coville 


G. Grossman 


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J. DeSantis 


J. Dexter 


R. Dorsey 


L. Douglas 


M. Dowd 


C. Downes 




President: Andy Moore 




Vice President: Greg Lasonde 



D. Gartner R. Gary N. Getchell R. Gibson B. Gladu C. Goebel 




"Swing your partner. Dosy do. Bow to your 
corner and now to your partner. Right and left 
grand then come home." These are the fam- 
ous calls from our faithful square dancing 
leader, Mr. Barrett. Most of us, aside from a 
few experts, were pretty bored with the idea 
of square dancing for three whole weeks. But 
after a couple classes we realized it wasn't 
that bad and even started to like it. Seriously, 
how hard is it to promenade and chain 
across. Look out world! Here come the Min- 
nechaug promenaders! 



A. jordon K. Kane 




T. LaMotte L. Langone G. Lasonde J. Laurino 




J. Law 0. Laware H. Leard H. Leard 



H. Leard B. Leary 



As a member of that third-year-of-high 
school class, I can say quite definitely that 
being a junior is a very hard bill to fill. I mean, 
what other class has to work hard and study 
almost non-stop throughout the whole year? 
All we heard our whole sophomore year was, 
"Have your fun now, because next year is 
what's important for college." And that sure 
was true, because believe me, those S.A.T.'s 
aren't something you can go in for cold. They 
really hurt! 

But junior year wasn't spent in total seclu- 
sion studying. It did have its moments, like 
that first glorious ride in the car when you, 
yourself, were the driver. After sitting through 
all that driver ed. aggravation and nerve-rack- 
ing behind-the-wheel, it was so sweet to final- 
ly hold that dear, little, rectangular card in 
your hand that gives you your okay to drive. 

S.A.T.'s, licences, and all those other end- 
less little moments worth remembering are 
what made up our junior year, our last year of 
being underclassmen. 




R. Morgan S. Morgan K. Moriarty N. Morris 




*2*r" 



G. Roth L. Roy D. Russell P. Rymsza S. Rymsza R. Sajdak 




C. Hutchison 
J. lellamo 

V. Jackson 
R. Jones 

A. Kalogeras 
G. Kubik 

L. LaValley 

D. Lennan 
J. Mason 

L. McDonald 
M. Mercier 
L. Pokorny 
L. Rainey 

B. Secor 
T. Sleith 
T. Smith 

B. Specht 

C. Witkop 
P. Young 



D. Wolford E. Worster A. Wytas T. Zeckhausen M. Zimmerman Hi! Mom 




D. Campbell M. Caney J. Cannamela F. Carlson D. Carr L. Castonguay 



D. Cerulli 


R. Chapin 


L. Chayer 


D. Clemens 


S. Cobbs 


J. Collette 


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C. Collins R. Collins F. Conley A. Conneil M. Connery T. Connors 




'- 1^3 



E. Diotalevi J. Diotalevi C. Dobson 



President: Tim Ross 

Vice President: Tony Roncalli 



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C. Donoghue K. Dowd B. Downes 




Secretary: Belinda Walt 



165 




J. Holman C. Hough S. Houghton D. Howard P. Hurley S. Insley 




K. Manzi J. Marinaro K. Marrett J. May M. Mayer M. Mayo 




W. Peck D. Person K. Perusse J. Phaneuf R. Phillips D. Pickett 



Project Adventure 

A great way to test your courage and deter- 
mination is provided in your sophomore year 
through Project Adventure. Think how fortu- 
nate you'll be years from now when someone 
asks if you can tackle an incline log (not liter- 
ally) or if you've ever been on a Berma 
Bridge. Freshmen year it was swimming; 
sophomore year it was Project Adventure. 
What will it be junior year? Only the gym 
teachers know. 




P. Sullivan S. Sutcliffe J. Sweetman J. Szmyt J. Tamsey S. Terrill 



M. Theocles C. Thibeault L. Thibeault S. Thibeault 

^B 10 




J. Zimmerman C. Zirakian 




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C. Burger M. Burgue M. Burns H. Burt C. Byrne T. Calabro 




C. Carlson T. Carmody H. Carranza R. Carrigan p. Carron W. Carter 




When that fateful day dawned cloudy and 
bleak, I took it as an omen of what was to 
come of my first encounter as a big high 
school student at Minnechaug. I really didn't 
know what to expect — the ever-smiling days 
of glee I pictured from looking through my 
brother's yearbook? Or the horror tales told 
me by last year's freshmen? What I actually 
experienced was a little of both. That first day 
was a doozy, with freshmen voices crying out 
from the murkiest depths of the school: 
"HELP!" "Rotating blocks"? Blocks of 
what?""Snackbreak? That's cool" (Little did 
I know that it wouldn't last through the fall.) 
"Those seniors are gorgeous!" "What is it 
with those guys lurking in the halls with walk- 
ie-talkies?" "Those seniors are so stuck up." 
"M-HALL?!?" 

By June, I had finally become an official 
contributor to "Minnechaug Mania." I got 
used to being the baby of the school again, 
and found out there really were three floors. I 
even got a friendly grunt out of a few of those 
very cool seniors. Come to think of it, it was a 
pretty O.K. year! 



K. Florio D. Flynn 



J. Franklin M. Fraser E. Frodema 




L. Jones R. Jones L. Joseph P. Kaczenski S. Kane J. Karam H. Karlson R. Keeton D. Keith 




J. Kuselias J. LaBelle C. LaBecque R. Lafleur R. Lambert L. Landers K. Last B. Lavinio M. LeBeau 




J. McNaughton J. Medeiros J. Mello A. Merchant M. Merchant A. Mercure L. Merritt J. Merwin T. Mileskie 




SPLAT! "All right! I got him with the 
whipped potatoes right in his ear!" Laughter 
resounds throughout the lunchroom and the 
food fight is on with a zillion portions of Min- 
nechaug's appetizing cuisine whizzing 
through the air. Although a few nervous stu- 
dents duck and try to shield themselves with 
their calculous notebooks, most are in the 
thick of it using their forks as slingshots and 
peas as bullets. After about a minute, herds of 
kids start stampeding towards the doors try- 
ing to escape before a teacher — patrolman 
— walks in with his notebook and starts tak- 
ing names. The few that do get caught have a 
pretty good excuse: "But what else is this 
cafeteria food good for besides ammuni- 
tion?" Good question! 



D. Richard J. Richard G. Ringwalt G. Roberts D. Robinson 




What, you ask, do you do when you're 
bored in school? Read the bathroom walls, of 
course! It's great to catch up on the latest 
gossip: who hates who, who loves who, who's 
going out with who, who broke up, and what 
everyone thinks of our school. Personally, I 
couldn't tell you what it says in the boy's 
room, but I can make a good guess. It must be 
nice, guys, to find out what everyone thinks of 
your girlfriend. 

Not only can you learn some catchy poems 
and find out about school "affairs", the walls 
of Minnechaug can provide hours of enjoy- 
ment on a gloomy day. Not meaning I suggest 
skipping classes, of course, but the next time 
you're roaming the halls during lunch or be- 
fore homeroom, take a trip to the bathroom, 
get comfortable and read away. 



K. Tobias S. Trainer D. Trebbe R. Troie 



K. Trombly M. Trombley 



CANDID CAMERA 





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COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE STITCHING POST, INC. 

NEEDLE ART SUPPLIES 

CUSTOM DESIGN 

2341 Boston Rd. 
Wilbraham 



BEST WISHES 

TO THE 
CLASS OF '80 



STEARNS 
YERRALL 



REALTORS 



Wilbraham • Springfield 




SIXTEEN ACRES GARDENS CENTER INC. 
1359 WILBRAHAM RD., SPRINGFIELD 



COURTESY OF 



cfhiendlk/ 

^^restaurants ** 




WILBRAHAM 
FLOWER SHOP 

Wilbraham 



SKORUPSnjRO 




SKORUPSKI'S SERVICE 

STATION 

Boston Road 
Wilbraham, Ma. 




183 





BEST WISHES FROM 

LANDRY& LYONS 

REALTORS® 

•^Better 




and Gardens 
WILBRAHAM 2040 Boston Road Wilbraham, Massachusetts 01095 




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FOR MEN 

WILBRAHAM 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



HAMPDEN 

COUNTRY 

CLUB 




MANNY'S 

TV & APPLIANCES 

WILBRAHAM 



Compliments Of 

WILBRAHAM 

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Schwendenmann, 

M.D. 
Robert Insley M.D. 




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Grown And Fresher 

BENNETT TURKEY 
FARMS 




PATRONS 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF '80 
OUTFITS, EASTFIELD MALL 

GOOD LUCK TO THE CLASS OF '80 
HUSTON'S SHOES 

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF '80 
MR. & MRS. YOUNG 

HAIR STYLES BY TONY 
455 MAIN STREET 
INDIAN ORCHARD, MA 

WILBRAHAM PHARMACY 
2769 BOSTON ROAD 
WILBRAHAM, MA 

CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF '80 
FRANK PROUTY - PAINTING 
CONTRACTOR 

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF '80 
FROM MR. & MRS. LAWRENCE E. 
DELGREGO 

GOOD LUCK TO THE CLASS OF '80 
FALCETTI MUSIC CENTERS 
INDIAN ORCHARD, WESTFIELD, ENFIELD, 
HOLYOKE MALL 

GOOD LUCK - VILLAGE FOOD MART 



GOOD LUCK FROM THE 
NEW MANAGEMENT OF 
GREEN VALLEY RESTAURANT 

CALICO CUPBOARD 
WISHES YOU SUCCESS 

LOUIS AND CLARK DRUG STORE 
459 MAIN STREET 
WILBRAHAM, MA 

MOTHER NATURE, INC. 
2132 BOSTON ROAD 
WILBRAHAM, MA 

GOOD LUCK CLASS OF '80 
SEARS ROEBUCK AND CO 
1585 BOSTON ROAD 
SPRINGFIELD, MA 

GREEN VALLEY DRUG 
SOMERS ROAD 
HAMPDEN, MA 
JEFFERY EDDY 

GOOD LUCK TO THE CLASS OF '80 
WHYTE CO., INC. REALTORS 
466 MAIN ST. 
WILBRAHAM 596-6711 



SPONSORS 



Eddie, Vinnie, Tom, and Kevin, Good luck always. - 
Anne 

Best of luck to Anita. - Love Mom and Dad 

Annie, Barb, and Margie, spread joy! Keep smiling! 
Thanks for the fond memories. - Patti 

Mary Martha and Ellie May. Weely Impwessive, hu? - 
Luv Amy Lee 

Ande le, Ande le, Yee-Hah. - Willy and Shell 

Good luck "cafeteria girls" Lisa, Karen, Chris, and 
Charlotte. - "Ma" 

To Zip and Zwidget: Try to make it home before the 
season's over. - "Moi" 

Greg, sorry it ended like it did some time ago — 
"Let's try again." 

Mark, you're a great guy; please stay that way. 
Thanks for being there. - "Lisa" 

Good luck Lisa Hansen. Love Mom and Dad, Judy 
and Lynn 



To us, "The crazy suspender gang" Dwidget, Moi 
and Toi. Keep smiling - "Zip" 

Hey gang, thanks again for being there when I need- 
ed you. - Lisa 

To Chuckie, Karen, and Chris I give all the green "M 
& M's" in the world. - Lisa 

Chris, Karen, Sally, Charlotte, Brenda, Kim, Debbie, 
and Robin, Good luck in the future. Take care. - Lisa 

To Lisa, Karen, Chris, Sally, and Debbie I leave a life- 
long friendship. - Chuck 

To Chipishawana: Mr. Bowlerman, Turk, and Scoot- 
er would be proud of you. 

To Paula, Congratulations! You made it! But Piggy 
still doesn't like you!! 

To Chips and Pish - the Ernsts and Pizza Pub - Paul 
Marshall and bowling and other fond memories. 




SPONSORS 



To Donna and Trish: We Made it!! Remember A. J. 
Foyt and The Sox and Tanglewood? - Love always 
Chips 

To Chips and Dwana: Dwight, David, and Brian don't 
know what they're missing. 

Thanks for the good times - Heather, Polly, Debbie, 
Debbie, Claire, Sheila, and Penny. 

Hey Plooey - Do a Bun check. 

Heather - The memories we've shared will last a 
lifetime - keep smiling. 

Hey Tom - Do you want to make twenty bucks? 

To Annie, Patti, and Margie: The greatest friends 
anyone could ask for. - Barbie 

To the four musketeers: May our friendship last for- 
ever! - Margie 

Thanks for the good times in "Chaug." Val, Fran, 
Deb, and to the rest of my good friends, Good luck. - 
Anita 

To the "pro." Ar Ar Ar Ar Ar 

Compliments of "Minkie." 



Tom, you were right, this was a year we'll never 
forget. 

Hope there's many more like it. - Patti 

Danny, thanks for the memories. Best of luck always 
Ann 

To the four musketeers and the great times we've 
shared. 

Lots of luck! - Us 

I just want to say two things: You're not too old and 
I'm not too nice! 

Lisa - memories . . . The pool lift . . . throwing cream 
pie at Hofmann ... the fly in the Coke . . . Chuckles 
. . . Thanks. 

To Gwendeline: What's Brentwood Dr. going to do 
without you? 

Penny and Heather - Do you have a quarter for the 
lady in McCrory's - Michelle 

Dougy - Who are you going to drive crazy when I'm 
gone? I leave you my red overalls. 

To Lenna and Joyce - Azad Haiastan 




MINNECHAUG NURSERY SCHOOL 




Tired of dancing girls 



"It's A Pleasure 
To Serve You" 

STAN-MAR VENDORS 

Wilbraham 




I'm beautiful. 



COLONIAL BEAUTY 
SALON 

Styling For Men & Women 




THE WILBRAHAM SHOPS 



W.F. LOGAN INSURANCE AGENCY 

WILBRAHAM SHOPS CLEANERS 

THE STITCHING POST 

CRAWFORD & CO 



WILBRAHAM GOURMET FOODS 

TERI-MARI COIFFURES 

MR. JOHN MEN'S HAIR STYLES 

CALICO CUPBOARD 







Ms. D'anthony's G Block 




MEDEIROS-WILLIAMS 
CHEVROLET, INC. 

Sales & Service 

8 A.M. - 9 P.M. Daily 

Wilbraham 



S 




JOHN LAPIERRE 
OPTICIANS 

Springfield 




191 



STEVEN'S 
PHOTOGRAPHY, INC. 

33 PROSPECT STREET 

EAST LONGMEADOW 

525-4263 

"YOUR CLASS PHOTOGRAPHER" 

CONGRATULATIONS 

CLASS OF '80 



CASUAL, CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY 
FOR ANY NEED - PORTRAITS, 
WEDDINGS, FAMILY GROUPS 



PROFFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 
OF AMERICA, INC. 



THE SIGN OF THE TIMES . . 




596-3896 



2701 BOSTON ROAD 
WILBRAHAM. MA. 01095 

REAL ESTATE 

INSURANCE 

MORTGAGE LOANS 



GOOD LUCK 

TO 

THE CLASS OF 80 

FROM 

A AND M MERCANTILE 

2805 BOSTON ROAD 

WILBRAHAM 

596-2111 



THINGS TO RENT 
FOR EVERY EVENT 



1997 BOSTON ROAD 

WILBRAHAM, MASS. 

TEL 543-4255 




otl 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE CLASS OF 
1980 

BOLDUC'S MOBILE 

SELF-SERVE 

BOLDUC'S GULF FULL SERVE 

16 ACRES GULF 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF '80 



£>&<£ 




JANAR 
GYMNASTICS 



Wilbraham 




WILBRAHAM 
TEN PIN 

Boston Road 
Wilbraham 



ANTONIO'S 

Boston Road 
Wilbraham 



THE SPECTACLE 
SHOPPE 

Crane Park 
Wilbraham 

596-8363 




Best Wishes to the 

CLASS OF 1980 

Congratulations on a job well done. 
May success follow you in your chosen career. 

TRUSTEES, OFFICERS AND STAFF 

Ludlow Savings IBank 

455 Main Street, Wilbraham 




CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE CLASS OF 

1980 

FROM THE CLASS OF 

1979 

AND 
COLLEGE FORMALS 

57 ENFIELD STREET. ENFIELD. CONNECTICUT 1120317410015 



V 



CCLLEGE 

FITTING EVERY OCCASION WITH STYLE 

IHUilt 



208 WALNUT STREET, SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 114131734-8777 





Left To Right Seated M. Logan, E. Page, Ms. Kline, D. Riley, S. Short 

Back: J. Duquette, L. Mandolini, L. Byrne, C. Ferrier, M. Busha, C. Cote 

D. Laware, K. Schafer, S. Maher 

Absent: K. Kane, B. Maryott, D. Warner 

Not Seen: R. Pelletier, K. Read 

Ms. Kline's G Block Class 




mm 



CO..INC. 



Telephone 783-1211 

1355 Boston Road 

Springfield 

Massachusetts 

01109 



BREADY'S 

FURNITURE 




BREADY'S 
FURNITURE 

Wilbraham 




VARIETY SHOPPE 

2571 Boston Road 
Wilbraham 

596-3192 



-,y nv>^ii i^yf:;.^ ^ 



INDUSTRIAUOMPONENTS 

3N 

? D/STR/Bk 




INDUSTRIAL 
COMPONENTS 

Wilbraham 



Good Luck 
Class Of '80 

COVER UP 

Eastfield Mall 
Springfield 




O'CONNOR'S 

Boston Road 
Wilbraham 



PROFESSIONAL AND 
COIN CLEANERS 

Corner Of 

East Longmeadow Rd. 

Hampden 

566-8023 



k 




"Do you like my hair?" 

TWINS COIFFURES 

287 East Street 
Ludlow 

583-4873 






C^jlJ ~thz V block mn>f<\ cs 

4 WWM^\ 4 







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•~W/fcLyP/?£SEtfT' 



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SCREENPLAY - Joann Brennan 

PRODUCER - Jeff Kibbe 

DIRECTOR - David Bernstein { 

CAMERA - James Cooley 

AUDIO - Wendy Hodgdon VIDEO - Steve Liquori 

LIGHTING - Todd Haraty PROPS - Tom Barkbuff . 

CASTING - Liz Brennan 

MAKEUP & COSTUMES - Mary Metzger, Deb Farnbam 

WITH SPECIAL APPEARANCES FROM: Paula Harris 

Ed Holda 

Ann Lively A 

Andy Kern 




FOUR CORNERS 
ARCO 

201 IN. Main Street 
E. Longmeadow 



OLD COACH ANTIQUES 



2805 Boston Road 

Wilbraham, MA 

596-3736 




NATHAN'S PLACE 



Rt 20 Monson MA. 283-4554 




HANK'S STONY HILL 

ARCO 

Boston Road 
Wilbraham 



E Qa m m 



■Slliiitti Wii 







GREEN ACRES 
FRUIT FARM 

868 Main Street 
Wilbraham 





VILLAGE STORE 

462 Main Street 
Wilbraham 

596-3900 




WILBRAHAM 
BARBER SHOP 

Springfield St. 
Wilbraham 





VINS MOBILE 

Main Street 
Wilbraham 




ALPHA OIL 

Best Wishes 
Class Of '80 






Compliments 


True Value 


Of A 


2701 Boston Road 


Friend 


Wilbraham 




1980 FALCON EDITORS 



* 



^tVlK^ 




P.O. BOX 131 
WILBRAHAM 





HONORS ENGLISH SEMINAR: 
YOUR HOPE FOR THE FUTURE 



Ontuifc 



21 



DOUGLAS REAL 
ESTATE 

1264 PARKER STREET 
16 ACRES CENTER 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 
THE CLASS OF 1980 

AND ESPECIALLY 

TO MY DAUGHTER 
TERESA 



Gnluw- 

T=T=i nnZI 

DOUGLAS REAL 
ESTATE 

1264 PARKER STREET 
16 ACRES CENTER 



GnlUK- 

Inn n riZI 

DOUGLAS REAL 
ESTATE 

1264 PARKER STREET 
16 ACRES CENTER 

782-2327 



Dr. Arthur Wig 

2689 Boston Road 

Wilbraham 



BOURBEAU 

AND 

HINCH 

23 Somers Road 
Hampden 



GRANT'S 
ARCO 

Main Street 
Hampden 




"The apple monsters. 



BILTON'S MT. SIDE 
ORCHARD 

Hampden 




HANDCRAFTED REFINISHING 

& 

UPHOLSTERING CO. 

Stripping - Caning & Rushing 

Antiques Restored 

Complete Line Fabric 

2424 Boston Road 
Wilbraham 

596-6518 




Realty Co. 

2022 Boston Road 
Wilbraham 

543-4040 



Congratulations 
to the Class of 




Be sure to watch "As Schools Match Wits" 
sponsored by Community Savings Bank, Satur- 
day evenings at 7:30 P.M. on WWLP-Channel 22 

Copimunity 

See Us For Educational Loans (H.E.L.P.) & New 
and Used Car Loans 

536-7220 



TERI-MARI COIFFURES 

2341 Boston Road 
Wilbraham 

596-8748 



THANK YOOZ AND YOU'RE WELCOMES 



There were times when I honestly thought we wouldn't have a 
book this year. Everything seemed so confusing. The task of 
creating a yearbook takes a lot out of you and a written descrip- 
tion simply would not justify the sheer frustration felt by the 
editors as their deadlines approach. Everything else — work, 
school, sports, leisure — was in some way affected in order to 
get our pages done! The editors are self-motivated and dedicated 
people. They should be proud of the job they did. Maybe they 
weren't being paid, but they now have a permanent record of 
their work, their creativity, and the mere self-satisfaction from 
something like this is by far — priceless! 

Lisa Fusco 



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Panic! Paranoia! Chaos! Help! Such are the typical emotions of 
a yearbook editor. It takes a strong character to brave the pres- 
sures of this immense responsiblity. Those of you who haven't 
experienced it have no idea the amount of work that has gone 
into this book. You look for your picture, collect signatures, and 
maybe in a few years, you'll go back and really read your year- 
book. What may seem like just another yearbook to you repre- 
sents the results of hours of work, near heart attacks, sleepless 
nights, neglecting school work and staying after 'til it's just you 
and the janitors to we, the yearbook editors. So take a closer 
look, pay attention to details, and please don't complain if you 
don't like this book. If you can do better, here's your challenge! 

Despite the loads of work, being an editor does have its re- 
wards, and we in Y-l have some excellent times. We're like a big 
family, fights and all, so if you hear screaming and yelling when 
you walk by in the morning, or see crumpled up layouts thrown all 
over the room, you'd know why. We're quite a crew, and I want 
to take this time to personally say, congratulations: Lisa, Elaine, 
Rosey, Seda, Beth, Judy, Anne, Bob, Kristin, Kathy, Scott, Patty, 
Amy, Sue, Larry, Mrs. J., Julie, and Mr. T. You've done a hell of a 
job! 

Tracey Zeckhausen 



We would like to thank Don Lendry for having yearbooking 
down to a science, and Mr. Jones and Mr. Maciaszek and their 
students for the artwork that appears in the senior section. We 
would also like to thank Dick Lucius and his falcon for the beauti- 
ful photographs; Judy Pezza would like to thank herself for all her 
hard work and frustration; the sports section thanks Charlene 
Downes for her running around; and thanks has to go to Sharon 
Chapman just for being the fag that she is (from the zoom from 
the Planet of Shaving Cream). Thanks to Steven's and especially 
Mark Caron, all the coaches and advisors, Mr. Mina, and each 
section editor wishes to thank their hard-working staffs, without 
whom there wouldn't have been a yearbook. Lastly and especial- 
ly, the yearbook editors and their faithful advisor should be given 
a pat on the back for going through all that hell and asking 
nothing in return. 




Can we go back to bed, now? 





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